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HolyBejebus

A Treatise in Support of Grimdugan as the Lord of the Miners and Mining

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<>==<> | A Treatise in Support of Grimdugan’s Claim to the Portfolio of Mining | <>==<>


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

<>-_-_-_-<> Authored by Dugmir Irongut, Priest of Da Kirkja Dverga <>-_-_-_-<>

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION:


 

Grimdugan is not only the God of Mining, but lays claim to all the gemstones and ores found within the stone. Recently, it has come to my attention that many falsely believe it to be Yemekar who is the God of Mining. Yemekar created gemstones, but it is Grimdugan who compels us to seek them out and mine them. If we were creating  gemstones, or more practically cutting gemstones for use in jewellery than that would fall under the dominion of Yemekar. Grimdugan is what gives us the power to seek out the gems and mine them, due to our inherent greedy nature. Not only this, Grimdugan is the God of Darkness, and in the darkness dwells the gemstones which are mined.

 

It is important that the Clergy accept that Grimdugan is the God of Miners, and allow him to take on a more respectable profession within his dominion. As it stands, Grimdugan is only the God of Dwarven Thieves and Merchants. In order to revitalize the worship of Grimdugan, it would be beneficial to have Grimdugan take on his rightful mantle of the God of Miners and Mining. Theologically it makes sense for Grimdugan to be the God of Mining and Miners, and it also will be beneficial to the larger community to have Grimdugan take on a more respectable mantle.


 

GREED:

 

 

What drives the Dwed to the depths in search of gems and ore? Is it not a sense of Greed that we delve into the depths? Grimdugan is the God of Greed, this is not denied by any good worshipper of the Brathmordakin. A dwed who travels into the depths of stone, and wraps themselves in the cold embrace of the dark is a dwed who is greedy. They risk their life for the potential of mining gold, emeralds, diamonds, and iron. The compelling force of mining is done through GREED, not for any other purpose. If another purpose is there, hidden beneath it is greed. Grimdugan walks with ever miner in the dark, and gives us power in our greed.

 

Yemekar may have crafted gems into the stone, but Yemekar does not lay claim to the powers which drive us into the depths to mine them. That belongs only to Grimdugan, Yemekar is the God of the Gems, but Grimdugan is the God of Greed - who drives the dwed to mining them. The force which drives us to mine is controlled by Grimdugan, so why can we not say that it is Grimdugan who has empowered miners to travel into the dark and actually mine these rare gems?

 

For Yemekar, he is the God of Craftsmanship because he drives us to create works. Why is it then that we deny Grimdugan the ability to be the God of Mining, as Greed drives us to delve into the depths in search for riches? It is said that Grimdugan wants his favoured to go out and “seek riches at all costs”. Mining is  seeking out riches at all costs, in the hopes of gaining more material wealth for not only yourself but your descendants. It is clear that the portfolio of Greed overlaps with the motivation behind a dwed seeking out precious gemstones, just as how craftsmanship is the motivation behind dwed building a new tool or machine in honour of Yemekar.


 

SHADOW:

 

 

As mentioned previously, when a miner travels into the depths he has cloaked himself in shadow - or as previously worded: “Darkness”. This darkness obscures ores and gems from the dwed, but Grimdugan can make the darkness fade and cause an obscured gem or ore to become seen by the miner. The shadow cloaks the gems (as Grimdugan wishes to “protect” and “hoard” his wealth), but he can reveal them to the devout when he feels the time is right. This is why it is preached that a dwed who has Grimdugan as their patron must hoard their gems and precious materials - for he has done the same. Grimdugan has only lifted the veil for you to share in his greed, and his wealth.

 

Miners are often covered in darkness themselves. A walk through the caves will reveal how little light is used, as burning coal is wasteful of resources. Instead, many miners will walk through the shadows in the hopes that Grimdugan will bless them and lift the veil of shadow. As Grimdugan uses this veil as a way to protect the gemstones and ores, it is only fair to say that by revealing what he has hidden - Grimdugan is blessing the miner with the ability to mine the ore. 

 

In addition, shadow also hides the goods that the Miners get. A miner is no good if he is robbed, so it is important for Miners to hide their wealth in the shadows - to obscure it. This can only be done through the grace of Grimdugan, in the hopes that he will not reveal your wealth to others.

 

THIEVING:

 

 

Grimdugan is the God of Thieves. The God of Thieves is also the God of Stealing. It is logical to say that when a miner goes out to mine, they are “stealing” from the stone - and taking the gems and ores from the divine creation. In this case, they are acting as agents of Grimdugan as they are venturing out due to their greed, cloaked in shadow, to steal from the ground to bring back gems and riches. They do this at great peril, as cave-ins, spiders, and death lurks around the mines everytime a dwed steps foot in them.

 

This means that a miner is, essentially, a thief who steals precious materials from the ground. This is due to the risks associated with it, and how the dirt and stone guard their precious materials so violently and with such fervour.

 

There is only one word for this: theft. The theft of the resources of the world are done at the hands of miners, who are going out to fulfill their greed which Grimdugan fills us with. The theft of these materials comes at great danger, proving that it is greed which motivates us to go and mine these materials.


 

RESPECTABILITY:

 

 

Grimdugan is often the most misunderstood of the Brathmordakin. Many look down upon him and his followers as thieves and brigands, but that is not the case. Grimdugan should have what is rightfully his, that being the portfolio of Mining and Miners. Mining is one of the most noblest of professions within the under-realm, so by granting Grimdugan this portfolio which is rightfully his, we elevate the status of his divinity so that more people will begin to openly praise Grimdugan.

 

This in turn will bring the Chosen of Grimdugan back into the fold, and have more and better maintained shrines to him within the darkness. Additionally, there is no member of the divinity which has the portfolio of mining - the closest is Yemekar with his portfolio of Stonework. It is time to bring mining and miners into the fold, as it is one of the oldest professions a dwed can have.

 

 

CONCLUSION:

 

 

Grimdugan is the God of Miners and Mining, and should take his place as a God who has a serious profession as one of his portfolios. Grimdugan has the least amount of followers due to this, as the others all have less niche portfolios. As it stands, only dwedmarian thieves actively worship Grimdugan. 

 

While it is the opinion of the Author that stealing from the lesser races is indeed noble and honourable, the author does not believe that this small amount of dwarves is enough to maintain and protect the shrines of Grimdugan. It is time for Grimdugan to receive the respect he deserves, and to have a greater number of followers. By including this as apart of his pantheon, it will increase the amount of dwed who openly praise him - thus ensuring his shrines are well protected within the caverns.

 

 

 

 

Edited by HolyBejebus

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Dwain reads and slowly nods his head.

 

'Fer a beardlin 'e knows well'

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Preceptor Baldin Ironside nods in agreement “Thes es somethin that a’ deepleh agree weth. Grimdugan es tha most missunderstood ef all tha Brathmordakin makin ‘is worship almost nonexistant. Et es a shame tha en mi time as ‘igh preceptor a’ ded net push fer this, bat mi mind wes focused en otha thengs. Without a doubt thes es something tha must be established en our ‘oly texts and teaching. A’ see great promise en thes lad.”

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