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Tenth Session of the Imperial Senate, 1754-1756

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Tenth Session of the Imperial Senate, 1754-1756


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Processing with Vice Chancellor Hugo Wright, President Pro Tempore Terrence May arrived at the desk to begin the ceremony of inaugurating the new session of the Senate. The latter then began to address the chamber after calling it to order: 

 

“Mister Vice Chancellor and honorable colleagues of the Tenth Session of the Imperial Senate, 

 

Today, we inaugurate, with sentiments of solemnity and mirth, another convocation of this great institution. At this present time, I look back with great nostalgia, I must admit. As I see new colleagues entering for the first time as Senators of their respective provinces, I wish you all godspeed and the strength needed to conduct this office with integrity. As for myself, this is my tenth session ever since we began this noble experiment. Through the near two decades of this body’s work, I am confident that we have solidified our place as the people’s house. We are first subjects of this Empire, representatives of our electorate, and public servants who must carry the dignity of the Senate with utmost humility and reverence for the Rule of Law. Let us proceed as champions of Imperial unity, fostering our commitment to be co-authors of a new age and to let the new generation of Orenians prosper from our service in this place. So help us God.” 

 

Upon the conclusion of his remarks, the Vice Chancellor instructed the Clerk of the Roll to begin calling the roster of the current members to inaugurate the Tenth Session of the Senate. 


 

“The senior senator from Helena, Mr. Lauritz Christiansen,

Whose term expires in the year 1758,

 

“The junior senator from Helena, Ms. Louisa Pruvia,

Whose term expires in the year 1756, 

 

The senior senator from Haense, Sir Terrence May GCM,

Whose term expires in the year 1756,

 

The junior senator from Haense, Sir Konrad Stafyr KM,

Whose term expires in the year 1758,

 

The senior senator from Kaedrin, Mr. Arthur Callahan,

Whose term expires in the year 1756,

 

The junior senator from Kaedrin, Mr. Richard Helvets,

Whose term expires in the year 1758,

 

The senior senator from Curon, Ms. Vivaca Rutledge,

Whose term expires in the year 1758.” 

 

The junior senator from Curon, Mr. Clovis Farlander,

Whose term expires in the year 1756.”

 


 

((Only the people whose characters are listed above may post.))


 

Edited by Imperial_Office_of_Civil_Affairs

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Senator Vivaca Rutledge rises from her seat

”Mister President, I would like to congratulate Sir Konrad Stafyr GCM, Lauritz Christiansen and Richard Helvets on their election victories. I would also like to congratulate Louisa Pruvia on being appointed to the Senate, it is about time Helena had a female representative. Democracy is what distinguishes Oren from her barbarian enemies, and it warms my heart to see the citizens of the Holy Orenian Empire participate in democracy. This is the people's house, this is not 'our’ chamber, but it is the people’s chamber!” She concludes, sitting back down

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Senator Lauritz H. Christiansen rises from his seat afterwards and thanks Vivaca Rutledge for the warm welcome, before proceeding:

”I am very happy that the population of Helena decided to entrust me with this position, and I am sure that all of us here together can ensure that our Empire shall continue to prosper for many years to follow, way beyond the timespan of our own lives, as is the destiny of the Holy Oreniam Empire. May we all contribute what we can do to the future.” He sits back down, pleased with himself.

 

 

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The President pro tempore approaches the lectern, producing folded documents which contain a pre-written speech.

“My honorable colleagues and my fellow Orenians,

 

I am honored to preside over another session of the Imperial Senate. As we welcome a new cohort of Imperial Senators joining us in this most hallowed hall, we are reminded that as representatives of our constituents, we are charged with the greatest vocation of legislating on their behalf. For nearly twenty years, the people of Haense have bestowed upon me this right, not as an accolade to my own vanity or pursuit of prestige in public office, but rather as their servant who toils in the fields to reap the harvests that sustain our society. In half of that time, I have held the gavel where I have been privileged to have seen unprecedented progress in our legislature, fostering the collaborative environment that so makes our government function. In so doing, we have passed legislation that continues to improve our social framework, our political discourse, our economic prowess, and our cultural unity. I have been so honored by having the confidence of the majority to sit in the chair and represent this body to the public, ensuring that the legislative business be enacted with great diligence and responsibility. 

However, I have come to the conclusion that in order for the Senate to thrive and renew this promise for the generation of Orenians that are now coming of age and defining their sense of identity, it is important that the Senate also reflect that same changing and living dynamic. The beauty of our State is that the Tapestry of Man continues to wave triumphantly as we tailor the fabric that makes us whole. Therefore, I am announcing that I shall step down as President pro tempore of the Imperial Senate at the end of the Tenth Session of the Imperial Senate, intending to conclude ten years of service in the chair as the presiding officer. Following the ambition and resoluteness of Sir Frederick Armas and the collegiality of Sir Charles Napier, I hope that my contributions to this office, and indeed to this institution, bring a distinct character for future senators to emulate and innovate. I shall continue to serve the people of my constituency with equal vigor and passion, and thus allow other colleagues to lead this legislature to continue the promise of ensuring that the integrity and authority of the Senate remain in perpetuity. Thank you.” 

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Sir Konrad Stafyr, the junior senator for Haense, was silent as the President Pro-Tempore spoke. Upon hearing news of his resignation, he would let out a simple sigh. Rising to speak as Terrence sits down, he says,

 

“The service of my colleague, the President Pro-Tempore, shall not be forgotten. He has done much to strengthen the institutional integrity of this body over the years, and I applaud him for his hard work and diligence in making the Imperial Senate a strong and stable institution, and helping to foster its growth to become one of the longest lasting in recorded human history.”

Clearing his throat, he adds, “And as to myself, I would like to thank the Honorable Senator from Curon for her warm welcome.” He offers her a soft, friendly smile, folding his hands behind his back as he continues to speak.

“My constituents, the Haeseni people, have seen it fit to send me to Helena as one of their elected representatives in the Imperial Senate. I look forward to working with my most honorable colleagues to make this Empire a better place for all of it’s subjects. To do so is based on the mandate that I have been given by those whom elected me, and I shall see it through.”

 

Sitting back down, Konrad goes silent once again, folding his hands on top of his desk.

Edited by AndrewTech

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Senator Vivaca Rutledge rises,

”Thank you mister president for your service to this house. I will stand for the position of President pro Tempore after you resign and I will continue your work. We aren’t masters of the people, we are their servants.”

@Piov

 

Edited by PapiZapii

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Hunched over his desk in Novellen, the Emperor carefully scribes,

“The Imperial Personhood Act of 1754 will receive Crown assent automatically upon the correction of ‘Orog’ to ‘Olog’.

For the Varoche Act of 1753, the Crown requires that the protections afforded to the Edict of Establishment must be defined. Does this immunize that document from amendment?

 

To the Shearing Act of 1752, the Crown vigorously assents.”

 

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IMPERIAL SENATE

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Subpoena Duces Tecum

 


 

 

TO: The Honorable Joseph Clement Videnz-Novellen

Secretary of the Interior

The Novellen, City of Helena,

Holy Orenian Empire

 

 


 

 

Pursuant to the Writ of Summons as prescribed in the Edict of Establishment of 1736, you are hereby commanded to appear before His Imperial Majesty’s Senate for testimony on or before the 15th of Tobias’ Bounty, 1755, and to produce for inspection to the Office of the President pro tempore any and all documents, records, or other tangible things which are in your possession or under your control relating to the following:

 

  • Appropriations and Expenditures for the infrastructural development of the City of Helena from 1752 through 1754.

  • Updating the Imperial Employment Opportunities Registry.

 

 


 

 

TO: The Honorable Joseph D. Adler

Solicitor-General 

The Novellen, City of Helena,

Holy Orenian Empire

 

 


 

 

Pursuant to the Writ of Summons as prescribed in the Edict of Establishment of 1736, you are hereby commanded to appear before His Imperial Majesty’s Senate for testimony on or before the 15th of Tobias’ Bounty, 1755, and to produce for inspection to the Office of the President pro tempore any and all documents, records, or other tangible things which are in your possession or under your control relating to the following:

 

  • Appropriations and expenditures for the Ministry of Justice from the years of 1752 to 1754.

  • On the matter of revising the legal code of the Holy Orenian Empire.


 

 


 


Fail not under penalty of law. Witness my hand and the seal of the Imperial Senate, at the City of Helena this 13th of Horen’s Calling, 1755.

 

 

Signed,

T6CexKj3Vl0UsP8huQxpkQ6x52QGpwXbH4x3SG-LdbVdxpvR-D4NyTpnfiI6ifX5EWmlh22Cfdo4pz2waVUZtsLe8dpyghQ4DG2dRlDBH65G6wv0bEZ1P-It0AmcgSzcusQcMVyj

President pro tempore of the Imperial Senate

 

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22 hours ago, ARCHITECUS said:

Hunched over his desk in Novellen, the Emperor carefully scribes,

“The Imperial Personhood Act of 1754 will receive Crown assent automatically upon the correction of ‘Orog’ to ‘Olog’.

For the Varoche Act of 1753, the Crown requires that the protections afforded to the Edict of Establishment must be defined. Does this immunize that document from amendment?

 

To the Shearing Act of 1752, the Crown vigorously assents.”

 


Senator May scribes a message back to the Crown, 


“Your Imperial Majesty, the Senate does hereby receive His Imperial Majesty’s correspondence regarding our most recent legislative actions. I return to the Novellen the Imperial Personhood Act of 1754 with the necessary revision. Furthermore, we adhere to a conditional withholding of assent to the Varoche Bill until we convene for its reconsideration on a later time.”



@ARCHITECUS

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IMPERIAL SENATE

14th of Owyn’s Flame, 1755

 

Members Present

Senator Lauritz Christiansen of Helena

Sir Terrence May GCM of Haense

Miss Louisa Pruvia of Helena

Sir Konrad Stafyr KM of Haense

 

P. d’Arkent: Peter Baldwin d’Arkent

S. Corbish: Siegmund Corbish
 


T. May: “As you may know, I have served in this Senate for almost twenty years. Since 1736 when this institution was founded, I served with many cohorts over the years. I am happy to see a fresh class of senators.”

 

May: “Moreover, I have stated many times the importance of this place. I am eager to see you all renew this responsibility.”

 

May: “I am announcing that I am stepping down from the office of President pro tempore upon the end of this session.”

 

May: “It has been the honor of my life to lead this legislature and ensuring that our voices are heard in the governance of the state.”

 

May: “The Chair now recognizes the junior senator from Haense for the first reading of the Imperial Exchange Program.”

 

K. Stafyr: “Ladies and gentlemen, I come before you today with my maiden proposal.”

IMPERIAL EXCHANGE PROGRAM BILL

 

Stafyr: “It is a very simple one, to be sure, but the purpose of this bill would be to offer up a new educational opportunity to expand the horizons of our Empire’s youth.”

 

Stafyr: “The Imperial Exchange Program, if passed into law, would allow for youths from Helena and the provinces to apply for entrance into a cultural exchange program which would allow for them to travel to a province abroad to learn about the customs and cultures of those lands.”

Stafyr: “It would be overseen by the Ministry of Civil Affairs, specifically by the Assistant Undersecretary for Education. The actual piece of legislation goes into the details a bit further, so I won’t bore my most honorable colleagues with the specifics.”

 

T. May takes to the floor.

May: “I rise to co-sponsor the bill.”

 

May. “In 1745 I passed the Scholastic Organization Act. Today we must keep our promise to Oren’s children and foster literacy, education, and culture in our society for the next generation of leaders!”

 

May: “I yield the floor.”

 

T. May leaves the floor.

 

May: “Is there further action to take on the matter?”

 

Stafyr: “Very quite today. I see… Not sure if that’s a good or bad thing. I move that we take a vote on this bill.”

 

May: “Is there objection?”

 

L. Christiansen: “Seems there is no objection.”

 

May: “Without objection, I will now call the roll.”

 

May: “Mister Christiansen.”

 

Christiansen: “I vote aye.”

 

May: “Mister Christiansen- AYE.”

 

May: “Sir May votes AYE.”

 

May: “Miss Pruvia.”

 

L. Pruvia: “Aye.”

 

May: “Miss Pruvia- AYE.”

 

May: “Sir Stafyr.”

 

K. Stafyr: “Aye.”

 

May: “Sir Stafyr- AYE.”

 

May: “On this vote, the AYEs are four with four members not present. The bill will proceed with the absence of quorum.”

 

Christiansen: “It does appear that we are missing our Curonian and Kaedreni colleagues, sadly.”

 

P. D’Arkent: “Who’s paying the 500 minas? Are you going to levy another tax on the people?!”

 

May: “Order.”

 

May: “As a reminder to our guests, expressions of approval and disapproval are not permitted in the gallery.”

 

May: “I know recognize the senior senator from Helena for the introduction of the Marriage Incentive Bill.”

MARRIAGE INCENTIVE BILL

 

Christiansen takes the floor.

 

Christiansen: “Yes, yes. I’ve come to propose my Marriage Incentive Act, which sees newlyweds and new parents receive breaks from the taxes that could otherwise be strenuous on their personal economies. Simply put, should the right conditions be met, the couple would recieve a tax break for a certain amount of time. Though, I fear, after researching, that with the current tax system, my bill may be impossible to implement currently.”

 

T. May descends to observe scribe’s drawing of Peter III, before turning to his seat. 

 

May: “Thank you, Senator.”

 

Stafyr: “I move that the Marriage Incentive Act be tabled until the specifications of the taxation system have been reviewed.”

 

Christiansen: “I support that notion. I also yield the floor.”

 

Christiansen leaves the floor. 

 

Pruvia: “I agree with Sir Konrad and Lauritz.”

 

P. D’Arkent: “When are we getting the water highway?”

 

May: “ORDER from the gallery.”

 

May: “I will now call the roll.”

 

May: “Mister Christiansen.”

 

Christiansen: “ Uh… Table the bill? For now?”

 

Silent assent from Terrence May.

 

Christiansen: “Aye. To tabling it.”

 

May: “Mister Christiansen- AYE.”

 

May: “Sir May votes AYE.”

 

May: “Miss Pruvia.”

 

Pruvia: “Aye.”

May: “Miss Pruvia- AYE.”

 

May: “Sir Stafyr.”

 

May: “Sir Stafyr.”

 

Stafyr: “Aye.”

 

May: “Sir Stafyr- AYE.”

 

May: “The bill is tabled.”

 

May: “I rise today to introduce a motion to begin debate to REPEAL the Imperial Vassal Taxation Act of 1750.”

 

May takes the floor.

 

Christiansen: “How coincidental.”

 

May: “We must begin efforts to clarify and ensure proper collection of revenues, review how departments spend their budgets, and I call on all senators to begin with transparency. This is a motion of transparency!” 

 

May: “I yield back.”

 

May leaves the floor.

 

Christiansen: “I’ll support it.”

 

Stafyr: “A few questions if I may, Sir Terrence.”

 

May: “Is there objection?”

 

May: “Parliamentary inquiry.”

 

May: “The gentleman is recognized.”

 

Stafyr: “Will the senate be granted oversight over this process of taxation reform? Although I am not a sitting member of the treasury committee, it is only right that the elected representatives of the provinces be given a chance to offer up their own input during this process, is it not?”

 

May: “I thank the honorable senator for his question. The Senate will have full oversight of the reform process granted that we move to vote on the repeal.”

 

May: “The Edict of Establishment grants us the power of appropriation and the power of the purse.”

 

S. Corbish: “Terrence, you’re doing God’s work.”

 

May: “Thank you.”

 

Stafyr: “Then I move that we proceed to take that vote, and aye, I am aware. Just confirming it with the chair.”

 

May: “The Senate will be in order.”

 

May: “We will begin with the roll call to begin the motion to repeal the Vassal Taxation Act.”

 

May: “Is there objection?”

 

Christiansen: “Nope.”

 

May: “Without objection, then so ordered.”

 

Stafyr: “Nay.”

 

May: “Mister Christiansen.”

 

Christiansen: “I vote aye.”

 

May: “Mister Christiansen- AYE.”

 

May: “Sir May votes AYE.”

 

May: “Miss Pruvia.”

 

Pruvia: “Aye.”

 

May: “Miss Pruvia- AYE.”

 

May: “Sir Stafyr.”

 

Stafyr: “Aye.”

 

May: “Sir Stafyr- AYE.”

 

May: “The motion is agreed to.”

 

May: “Is there further action from the members?” 

 

Christiansen: “In this regard? I do not believe so.”

 

May: “I recognize the senior senator from Helena for the final item on today’s agenda.”

 

Christiansen takes the floor.

 

IMPERIAL ARENA LEAGUE BILL

 

Christiansen: “Yes, the establishment of the Imperial Arena League and the Imperial Arena association.”

 

Christiansen: “Tournaments and such have become rare within the Empire, and the creation of a league, with the construction of a stadium, where there could be an annual meeting of the League to have a major tournament could become a most profitable agreement for the Empire.”

 

Christiansen: “Not only culturally, but economically.”

 

Christiansen: “The stadium itself, would not only be used for the League, but could be rented out for other events.”

 

Christiansen: “Could serve as a wedding venue, or for private duels and the like.”

 

P. D’Arkent: “And we’ll speak in blah!”

 

May: “Thank you, Senator.”

 

Christiansen: “I doubt it, Peter.”

 

Christiansen: “I yield the floor.”

 

Christiansen leaves the floor.

 

May: “Is there debate?”

 

Stafyr: “Aye.”

 

May: “I recognize the junior senator from Haense.”

 

Stafyr takes the floor.

 

Stafyr: “I wish to offer my support to the honorable senior senator from Helena, as I believe that this piece of legislation, if passed into law, could be rather lucriative [sic] to the economy of the greater Empire!”

 

Stafyr: “The provinces as well as the Imperial heartlands will no doubt benefit from the construction of an arena and a tournament league, although local leagues, of course, should be left up to the provinces.”

 

Stafyr: “That is all.”

 

Stafyr yields the floor.

 

May: “I rise today with many reservations concerning this legislation.”

 

May takes the floor. 

 

May: “Number one, the bill does not outline how much money will be spent on this MASSIVE project.”

 

May: “Do we want MORE spending?”

 

May: “A stadium to have elven pride parades?”

 

P. D’Arkent: “The city also doesn’t have space!”

 

May: “Do we want to have an arena where orcish gladiators will run around for amusement?!”

 

D’Arkent: “Preach.”

 

Christiansen: “May I?”

 

May: “No, I do not yield.”

 

Christiansen: “Well, Continue then.”

 

May: “While Helena gets more projects for a LARGE stadium, my constituents do not get funding for their schools or for food as we fight against the AIS menace.”

 

May: “This bill is unconstitutional because it legislates for only ONE province.”

 

May: “Now I yield back.”

 

May leaves the floor.

 

May: “The senior senator from Helena is recognized.”

 

Christiansen takes the floor.

 

Christiansen: “Firstly, I do agree that it is a massive project that will require spending, and I will gladly limit the amount spent on it. However, I do believe that it would make the money spent on it back. Additionally, the IAA [sic] would not allow the Stadium to be rented out for Elven Pride Parades, nor would it allow Orcish fighters. The Stadium and the League would be strictly for Orenian citizens. And it does not only legislate for one province, as the League applies to all Provinces.”

 

Christiansen: “Though I do support the idea of construction of stadiums in all Provinces.”

 

Christiansen: “To make it more inclusive.”

 

May: “Thank you.”

 

Christiansen: “I yield the floor.”

 

Christiansen yields the floor.

 

May: “I motion to table the bill.”

 

May: “Are there any objections?”

 

Stafyr: “Nay.”

 

Christiansen. “Nay, I can work on improving it with Sir Konrad.”

 

May: “I request the AYEs and NAYs.”

 

May: “Mister Christiansen.”

 

Christiansen: “Aye.”

 

May: “Aye to table?”

 

Stafyr: “Aye- to table. The issues found within this bill must be further explored and fixed.”

 

May: “Sir May votes AYE to table.”

 

May: “Miss Pruvia.”

 

Pruvia: “Aye.”

 

May: “The bill is tabled.”

 

May: “I hereby declare that the Senate stand adjourned until the next saint’s day.”


 

13th O.F. 1755

Scribed by Franziska Klara Kortrevich


 

Edited by Piov

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IMPERIAL SENATE

6qcTrUywFmJ2UyvD0-oRZ-rWuxlS6P9Wo2DjPyXjojThbRxZglXzHYpaRvp07w3_i-YlAOkAx2DRVmukwSgY7aydrvRsBNPdmdUbKRgvkMdnVuAIt0_xgid95Zfus0Upuj5BzAD6

Subpoena Duces Tecum

 


 

 

TO: The Honorable Peter de Sarkozy

Secretary of the Treasury

The Novellen, City of Helena,

Holy Orenian Empire

 

 


 

 

Pursuant to the Writ of Summons as prescribed in the Edict of Establishment of 1736, you are hereby commanded to appear before His Imperial Majesty’s Senate for testimony on or before the 20th of Owyn’s Flame, 1756, and to produce for inspection to the Office of the President pro tempore any and all documents, records, or other tangible things which are in your possession or under your control relating to the following:

 

  • Appropriations and Expenditures to the Ministry of the Interior and the Commissioner of Urban Planning for the infrastructural development of the City of Helena from 1751 through 1754.

  • Appropriations and Expenditures to the Ministry of Justice from the fiscal years of 1751 through 1754.

  • Appropriations and Expenditures to the War Office from the fiscal years of 1751 through 1754.

  • Appropriations and Expenditures to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs from the fiscal years of 1751 through 1754.

 

 


 

 

Fail not under penalty of law. Witness my hand and the seal of the Imperial Senate, at the City of Helena this 14th of Godfrey’s Triumph, 1755.


 

Signed,

nWs_W8VIBsb9_9hj27wLaL2t8vRJzdVKQkXPDF-cEhoyukUNdGMKLZBAVTEy6kIzQJmL7Y9sAYpla4LDlzYB5gLFME3hUj4zv_awyB6-ODu_juZhGzXJ3ROZstpKkHsg-jNtUSc-

President pro tempore of the Imperial Senate


 

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IMPERIAL SENATE

12th of Godfrey’s Triumph 1755

 

Subject: Hearing regarding the appropriations and expenditures of the Ministry of the Interior

Members Present

Senator Lauritz Christiansen of Helena

Sir Terrence May GCM of Haense

Senator Louisa Pruvia of Helena

Senator Vivaca Rutledge of Curon



Sir Terrence May: “Today, the Senate has subpoenaed you here to testify regarding the appropriations and the expenditures of the Ministry of the Interior.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “As we all are aware, the city has undergone a vast reconstruction plan and we have just witnessed an expansion of your staff.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “I now recognize myself for questioning.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Secretary, are you aware of the budget allocation for the Interior Ministry?”

 

Joseph Clement: “Yes, sir. Five-hundred marks per annum if I am correct.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “That is correct. So given that you have hired more staff and have construction projects, which I suppose have been authorized by your office, how do you manage to operate with this budget?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Have you gotten more funding?”


Joseph Clement: “You've asked two questions, sir. Which shall you have me answer first?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “I presume that the two questions are interconnected so answer as you would find appropriate to explain.”

 

Joseph Clement: “As it stands, my department has two men under its employ, these being… the Practitioner-General and the Commissioner of Buildings.”

 

Joseph Clement: “I have yet to pay either of these gentlemen. The Practitioner-General is a self-funded office, as per its Act, and I have not negotiated with the Commissioner as to his salary for it is a temporary office.”

 

Joseph Clement: “Because of this, I have not taken the steps necessary to receive my annual funding from the Treasury Ministry.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “So you are telling us that you continue to operate an office that has zero expenditures?”

 

Joseph Clement: “As far as I understand, yes.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “And the projects around the city? How are those paid for?”


Joseph Clement: “That would be a question for the Secretary of the Treasury. I understand the projects to be paid for out of the municipal budget.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “But by virtue of your office, you have oversight on municipal government, do you not?”

 

Joseph Clement: “I do, but as per the Helena Reformation Edicts, the City Clerk is an office of the Ministry of the Treasury.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “So what you are telling me is that you have no knowledge of the money being spent on projects that are subject to your authority as Secretary of the Interior. Is that correct?”

 

Joseph Clement: “No sir. I do have knowledge of the money being spent. As it stands, these projects are not paid for our of my ministry's annual department, and are instead paid out of the municipal budget.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The municipal budget is overseen by the Treasury but the officials are overseen by you. The buildings that we see going up are nominally authorized by you.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Am I correct?”

 

Joseph Clement: “The Commissioner of Buildings is overseen by myself, that is correct.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Does the Commissioner of Buildings seek funding beyond the scope of what this Senate has passed as the prescribed budget of your department?”

 

Joseph Clement: “The Commissioner is receiving funds outside the scope of the prescribed budget, that is correct.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Don't you find this alarming? We as the legislature are tasked with Bills of Appropriation as mandated by the Edict, but then staff under the Council of State can seek pell-mell?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Seeking money pell-mell without the authorization of this house. This is what is at the heart of today's hearing. From my view, it seems people in the department were complicit.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The budget is a law passed by this Senate, signed by the Crown.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Surely you do not deny this, do you?”

 

Joseph Clement: “I do not deny it, no,” the Duke shakes his head, his anxious hands clawing minutely at his coat pockets.

 

Sir Terrence May: “Colleagues, this is what is important, that we ensure that our laws are executed as we wrote them. This is a fine example of excess, expedience, and bureaucratic disorder. This sets a bad precedent to overlook our authority as the power of the purse.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “What I am most surprised, Mister Secretary, is that you have failed to show us any ledgers about the spending that you do!” 


Joseph Clement: “I do have the invoices of the Commissioner, sir. The Secretary of the Treasury has seen them.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Where are they? My desk is empty!”

 

Joseph Clement coughs into his arm, his clammy hands then seizing for a parchment which stuck itself out of his coat.

 

Joseph Clement: “I have it here. I apologize.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “This spending is four times beyond what we appropriated!”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The Imperial Budget Procedure of 1751 states that the Treasury is to submit, in-writing, proposals for amendment of budgetary allocations.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “I hold you to account for being complicit in the violation of two laws signed by the Emperor's hand. Mister Secretary, did you ever ask the Treasurer to change your budget as outlined by this legislation?”

 

Joseph Clement: “I have made requests for funding, Mister President.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Very well, that is all I needed to hear. I yield the floor.” Sir Terrence May: 

“Do colleagues seek to question the Secretary?” 

 

Sir Terrence May: “Very well. I will say that this is a sad day in our government. We are asked to confirm officials and we find that the laws are not being adhered to in their operations.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “And to those who might find this meeting trivial, it may not be the budget that they are ignoring.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “It may other things, fundamental rights and law, that is at stake. Do you understand the gravity of this complicity?” 

 

Joseph Clement: “While I understand this honorable chamber's inquiry, I have operated as I understood it under the law. The people of Helena need homes, and I have submitted requests to the Ministry of the Treasury to fund those requests.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Ah, so now I know where to look.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “From your testimony, the Treasury is at fault for the complicit disregard of the budget laws.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Thank you. This hearing is now adjourned.” 

 

A gavel dismisses the hearing.


 

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IMPERIAL SENATE
10th of Sigismund’s End, 1755

 

Members Present

Senator Lauritz Christiansen of Helena

Sir Terrence May GCM of Haense

Senator Vivaca Rutledge of Curon


Sir Terrence May: “Mister Solicitor-General, thank you for attending this hearing. It is better that there is less of a crowd in this kind of meeting.”

 

Joseph Adler: “I agree.”

 

Sir Terrence May rises, “Please raise your right hand.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?”

 

Joseph Adler: “I do.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Thank you. The Senate has summoned you here to testify regarding your expenditures in the last three fiscal years.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “As well as your insight on the proposed Orenian Revised Code.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Solicitor-General, are you aware of the budget allocation per annum for the Ministry of Justice?”

 

Joseph Adler: “The explicit amount? No. I have received funds from the Treasury 

but not a formal per annum sum.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Seven hundred-fifty marks.” He answers for him.

 

Sir Terrence May: “And how much have you received from the Treasury?”

 

Joseph Adler: “My personal funds have been entirely allocated to the Ministry for a decade, so to say precisely would be difficult.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Solicitor-General, have you ever issued a petition to the Treasurer to request a budget amendment so that you can obtain more funding for your staff?”

 

Joseph Adler: “No.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Did the Treasurer ever mention that to be part of the process in giving you any funding?”

 

Joseph Adler: “No.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Did you produce a ledger for today's hearing?”

 

Joseph Adler: “One of my clerks has it. I'll have it dropped by when he finishes and I can sign it. However, I do remember the current allocation of my expenses.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Very well. I will include this into the record and hold you to it to provide us the records later.”

 

Joseph Adler: “Of course.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Please state the expenses for the record.”

 

Joseph Adler: “Four-thousand livres. Purchasing of an office for my Ministry. Three-hundred livres, purchases of furnishing for the office. Two-hundred livres, classified payment in the aide of various investigations.”

 

Joseph Adler: “If any more arise they'll appear on the document. And please excuse me if I misremember any of those.”

 

Joseph Adler: “I've retold the expenses to the best of my ability.”

 

Sir Terrence May widens his eyes, “Seventy two hundred marks total?! Do you recall over what period these expenditures took place?”

 

Joseph Adler: “By my count that is four-thousand, five hundred livres, sir.”

 

Sir Terrence May scratches his head as he looks around, clearly he has become senile by being in office for nearly twenty years.

 

Sir Terrence May adjusts his spectacles as an aide whispers to him about how he heard the numbers wrong, “Over four thousand livres!”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Solicitor-General. Don't you understand how we in the Senate are frustrated by this? We by no means seek to block the resources that allow you to do your job.”

 

Joseph Adler: “Yes. The Ministry of Justice employees roughly the most of any State department, and thusly requires the largest office.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “However, the culture of complacency in the Council of State about the Imperial Budget law, which was signed by the Emperor, is being ignored in practice!”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Do you understand this?”

 

Joseph Adler says nothing for a moment, pondering an answer.

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Solicitor-General, are you aware of the powers enumerated in the Edict of Establishment? Surely you do, for you are the chief legal official of the State!”

 

Joseph Adler: “I do.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Stated here, Bills of Appropriations, does it not say that!?” He angrily waves his copy in the air.

 

Joseph Adler: “I'll check with a Ministry clerk to determine what it says.”

 

Sir Terrence May sighs, “Mister Solicitor-General, I am appalled by this reckless spending pattern by you and your colleagues.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Does the senior Senator from Helena have any questions?” He turns to Lauritz.

 

Lauritz Henrik: “I believe you have covered everything very thoroughly.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Good. Now, turning to the revised code. Do you believe it is necessary that we pass this new legal code?”

 

Joseph Adler: “I believe it is necessary that a new legal code is passed.”

 

Joseph Adler: “Whether it is yours is a matter yet to be determined.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Very well. And what recommendations, broadly or specifically, do you think are needed to be revised.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Excuse me?”

 

Joseph Adler: “I haven't been sent a copy of this proposed code.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Of course, because the Justice committee has not reported out any of the revisions.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “We will be sending you a copy once we finalize our draft.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “This is a hearing to discuss the necessity of revisions, not of the revised draft itself.”

 

Joseph Adler: “Good.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Once we do report out the draft, you will be the first to receive it so as to relay your input before we put it to the floor to vote.”

 

Joseph Adler: “The current codex is among the worst in history, frankly.”

 

Joseph Adler: “I'd prefer a return to the ten tables before continued usage of the current.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Please explain a part or whatever you seek to amend.” He folds his hands.

 

Joseph Adler: “Not to say I am a reactionary, but as my office seeks to enforce the law it finds the current code to be downright awful.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Awful because you find it too lenient or lacking in the sentencing?”

 

Joseph Adler: “Awful because I find the criminal code to be barren.”

 

Joseph Adler: “It relies on obtuse interpretation of law to prosecute for even some of the most violent crimes.”

 

Joseph Adler: “Let's take the incitement of a riot, for example.”

 

Joseph Adler: “While explicit incitement of rioting is perhaps too acute for our purposes here, is it not adequate that code be given for the incitement of violence in general?”

 

Charles Napier coughs. “May a member of the Gallery speak.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The gallery will be in order.” He taps the gavel.

 

Joseph Adler: “Or perhaps to help my Ministry of War compadres, what of even basic resistance to arrest?”

 

Joseph Adler: “There is no code adequately relating to this.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Understood. Do my colleagues have any questions for Mister 

Adler?”

 

Joseph Adler: “Before we move on I'd like to note that these are examples. The state of criminal law as a whole is far too small.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “I do.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The Senior Senator from Curon is recognized.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “So, with the rise of the Wonkers or 'Wonks' in the Empire, I'm guessing you do not want Wonks to have protections in the revised law code?”

 

 Joseph Adler: “No. My office will be submitted a request for judicial review on these froggers very soon.”

 

 Vivaca Rutledge: “That is all, Mister President. I yield the floor.”

 

 Sir Terrence May: “Very well. The Senate is satisfied with the appearance of Mister 

Joseph D. Adler, Solicitor-General of the Holy Orenian Empire. Before we dismiss you, do you have any final remarks?” He looks to him.

 

Joseph Adler: “None.”

 

 Sir Terrence May: “This hearing is now adjourned.” 

 

A gavel adjourns the hearing.


 

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IMPERIAL SENATE

14th of Tobias’ Bounty, 1756

 

Subject: Rivaini Bill, Liliana-Paddington Bill, Treasury Hearing

 

Members Present
Senator Lauritz Christiansen of Helena

Senator Richard Helvets of Kaedrin

Sir Terrence May GCM of Haense

Senator Louisa Pruvia of Helena

Senator Vivaca Rutledge of Curon

Sir Konrad Stafyr KM of Haense



Sir Terrence May: “I recognize the senior senator from Curon for the first reading of the Rivaini Bill.”

 

Lauritz Henrik: “Vivaca, do you want to sit with the rest of us?” He asked her with a smile.

 

Sir Terrence May: “Madam Senator, you may proceed.” He nods, sitting down.

 

Vivaca Rutledge rises, walking over to the other side of the chamber and handing out copies of her bill.

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Thank you, Mister President. I rise to introduce the Rivaini Act of 1756, named after my grandmother Prefect Rivaini Rutledge.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Cosponsored by my right honourable friend Terrence May, this bill is the right way forward. I yield the floor.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Is there debate on the measure?”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “An inquiry, if I may?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The junior senator from Haense.” He nods.

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “I would like to ask for a bit of clarification from my honorable colleague, the senior senator for Curon, as to who exactly would provide the scribe for the Archchancellor's speech?” Raising a brow as he adjusts his glasses, he adds, “Such isn't directly specified in the bill. Will it be the Senate or the presiding Ministry that will provide the scribe?”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “The Imperial Senate or the Ministry.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “So either could provide the scribe at their own discretion?”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Yes.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “In any case, if I were to porpose a friendly ammendment to clear up the language in Section II, Article IV, would you be willing to accept it without contestion?”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “Merely to specify where the scribe would be coming from, that is.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Of course.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “Splendid. Mister President?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The Senate may proceed.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Without objection, the amendment will appear on the bill for the final draft.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “I will now call the roll.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Christiansen.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr nods once. “Then I have no further questions. A finely written bill,” He states rather simply as he moves to take a seat.

 

Lauritz Henrik: “I vote aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Christiansen- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir May.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir May votes AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Pruvia.”

 

Louisa Antonia: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Pruvia- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Rutledge.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Rutledge- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir Stafyr.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir Stafyr- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “On this vote the AYES are five and the nays are zero. The Rivani Bill is adopted!”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Hooray.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “I now recognize the senior senator from Helena for the reading of the Liliana-Paddington Bill.”

 

Lauritz Henrik handed out the bill to his fellow Senators, allowing them time to read before releasing a singular cough into his fist. “If I may, the issue regarding Wonks, and other races in general, has been going for far too long. It is about time that their rights are defined.”

 

Lauritz Henrik: “In this bill, I define the rights of two kinds of species. Intelligent non-persons and constructs.”

 

Lauritz Henrik: “If there are any amendments that you wish to have made, please say so, for it is essential that a bill like this passes.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Does the senator yield?”

 

Lauritz Henrik: “I yield.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “If there is no objection to the bill, I will call the roll. Then we shall proceed with the hearing.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “President May shall I hand you the financial ledger.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “We are voting on a bill and then we will proceed with your hearing, Mister Secretary.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Christiansen.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Yes sir.”

 

Lauritz Henrik: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Christiansen- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir May votes AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Pruvia.”

 

Louisa Antonia: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Pruvia- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Rutledge.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Rutledge- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir Stafyr.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir Stafyr- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “On this vote the AYES are five and the nays are zero. The Liliana-Paddington Bill is adopted!”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The Senate will now come to order.” He turns to Peter.

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “Thank GOD.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Secretary, please raise your right hand.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Do you solemnly swear on the Holy Scrolls that the testimony that you are about to give is the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you God?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Aye I do.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Thank you.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Secretary, you have been summoned by the Senate to testify regarding the expenditures of the Imperial Government from fiscal year 1751 to 1754.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “As you may be aware, we have conducted two hearings prior to yours with your colleagues that consistently indicate that you have exceeded to the budget as passed by this body.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Today, I am offering a chance for you to clarify their statements and provide us with nothing short of the truth as you have been sworn to do.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “I now recognize myself for questions.” He pauses.

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Secretary, do you affirm the testimony of your colleagues that more money was allocated to their departments than what was passed by the Imperial Budget of 1750?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Only in terms of the judiciary.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Are you aware of the budget per annum for the Judiciary?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Seven hundred and fifty mina.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Marks, or Livrae, whatever we call it now.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “And how much more was the judiciary given?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “10,000 Mina.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Why was this done?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “It was for the bounty of Jasper Carrington.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “And was the bounty ever awarded?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Not that I know of.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Very well.” He shuffles papers around.

 

Sir Terrence May: “You contested that only Judiciary was given money over the budget from 1750 but we also had Secretary of the Interior testify who says otherwise.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The Commissioner of Urban Planning had received money from the Treasury as we understand it, that was more than the budget per annum for Interior.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Are you aware of the budget per annum for the Interior?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “500 Mina?”

 

Sir Terrence May: And how is Helena building all these things with a budget of five hundred?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “The Treasury hasn't been paying for the building effort.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Oh? So does the money just magically appear for us to use?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “No.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Your colleague testified that the Interior Ministry uses Municipal funds. Correct or no?”

Peter de Sarkozy: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “But he also states that the City Clerk is moderated by the Treasury, yes?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “The City of Helena is the private holding of his Imperial Majesty and is not under the jurisdiction of the budget.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Ah, but I have been notified that vassal taxes are not being collected so the budget comes from municipal funds.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Do you deny this?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “The Treasury started with 50,000 minas.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “So if municipal taxes and the budget are not subject to the treasury, and that vassal revenues are not being enforced, then where are you getting your money from?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “President May we're speaking about expenditures.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “10,000 Mina has gone to the Judiciary from the Treasury….”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Today, you have either expressed to me that you are not knowing what goes on in your job or are not doing your job at all!”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Secretary, yes this is about expenditures. But spending involves collecting, does it not?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “You are an accountant, you should know this!”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “We.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Yes?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “We're speaking about expenditures and expenditures means the outpouring of money.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “How can I investigate only spending if I cannot know where you get the money to do such spending?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “The City of Helena has decided to pay for the renovations to this here, it wasn't my choice.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Do you have the ledgers for the record?” He shakes his head.

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “I do not hold the Helena records.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “So the City Clerk, who is an official under the Treasury, disallows you from accessing the Helena Records?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “He has shown me them but I do not hold them.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Senator Rutledge.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Hm?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Do you have any questions for the Secretary?”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “I have one.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The gentlelady is recognized.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Secretary Sarkozy, you've let the Senate down! You've not only let the Senate down, but you've let yourself down. Tell me, in the next budget have you planned on giving the Civil office any money? Have you even spoken to the Secretary of Civil Affairs?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “You pleaded and berated me over funding the University project Senator Rutledge, but I tell you this.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “I haven't seen that project go anywhere Senator, and I have that Civil Affairs functions without a budget.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Yes yes, but ;perhaps the project isn't moving anywhere because you haven't given them any money?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “That's not how projects work Senator.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “You said to me ages ago that you were going to speak to the Secretary of Civil Affairs.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Notify the Stewardship not me.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Alright?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “I'm not a military officer.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Give me some time Saalih.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “I apologize Senator do continue.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “And my department has yet to be granted even a sum of money. The employees of the Civil Office work constantly to make our elections happen, with no funding whatsoever.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Senator Rutledge do employees of the Treasury get paid?”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “You've given us no ledgers and no answers, and quite frankly I'm disappointed in you as a secretary.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “That is all I have to say, Mister President.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Does the junior senator from Haense have any questions?”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr clears his throat, beginning to rise. “One or two, perhaps.” He says as he begins to approach the podium.

 

Sir Terrence May: “The gentleman is recognized.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “Secretary de Sarkozy… When you were summoned here today, we requested that you bring forth all pertinent documents regarding the treasury and its expenditures. Yet you have not done so,” He sighs, rubbing the bridge of his nose. “I have known you personally for years, so I know that your failure to do so could not have been purposeful. How soon do you think you could provide the senate with the wanted ledgers in question?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “I believed I offered President May the ledger of the Treasury when I walked in.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “What of the Helena records from the city clerk?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Those are the records of Helena.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “But they fall underneath your department, do they not?” He raises an eyebrow. “Would it not be possible to request of the city clerk that the senate be allowed to review these documents?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Respectfully Senator Strafyr, I was asked to bring forth relevant documents to my department.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “The relevant documents I brought pertained to the Treasury ledger.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “The Treasury ledger does not overview every fund that processes in Helena.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “But are the city records not a part of your department? We'd still like to review them regardless, if at all possible. Could such be arranged with the office of the city clerk, if need be?”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “Aye I can request them.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr nods once. “Very well then, thank you Mister Secretary.” Turning to May, he says, “No further questions.” And returns to his seat.

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Secretary, I now give this time for you to make a final closing statement and to transfer the ledgers for the record.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “My job as Treasurer has been to expand the financial holdings of this Empire and fund the Imperial Government for it to work efficiently. The Treasury sits at 211,000 minas give or that.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “We started at 50,000 Minas, I've grown this Empire as I've been instructed and I've done my job as far as I'm concerned. We have funded the Departments needing funding and have helped revitalize the Orenian economy.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy Sighs “I am sorry that I cannot fund a University that is even thought through. I am sorry that I have had to authorize some transactions that were outside the budget, but in an Empire such as this….It's needed.”

 

Peter de Sarkozy: “That is all President May.”


Sir Terrence May: “Mister Secretary, today's hearing confirms that you are hesitant to be transparent with the Orenian people, regardless of the fruits of your labor. Today, all we heard was that the ends justify the means.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Unfortunately, we do not agree that doing things for expedience, regardless of the law is the right way.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The Imperial Budget was designated by your office and passed by this body, signed by our Emperor, and yet your excuse is that 'it is needed' and that is shameful.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “The reason we summoned you is because we found breaches of our law. What if it was not the budget in question. What if a colleague of yours violated a law he was tasked to execute?”

 

Sir Terrence May: “I adjourn this hearing and compel that the Treasurer submit the ledgers for the record.”

The Treasurer departs.

 

Sir Terrence May: “Colleagues, the question is on the motion to find Peter de Sarkozy, Secretary of the Treasury to be held in contempt of the Senate and to proceed with inquiry into impeachment.”
 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Christiansen.”

 

Lauritz Henrik: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Mister Christiansen- AYE.”

Sir Terrence: “Mister Helvets.”

Richard Helvets: “Aye.”

Sir Terrence: “Mister Helvets- AYE.” 

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir May votes AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Pruvia.”

 

Louisa Antonia: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Pruvia- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Rutledge.”

 

Vivaca Rutledge: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Miss Rutledge- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir Stafyr.”

 

Sir Konrad Stafyr: “Aye.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “Sir Stafyr- AYE.”

 

Sir Terrence May: “On this vote the AYES are six and the nays are zero. Mister Peter de Sarkozy, Secretary of the Treasury, is hereby CENSURED by the Imperial Senate. Pursuant to the majority, we shall now advance the inquiry.” 


A gavel adjourns the meeting.


 

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The President pro Tempore rises to addresses the Senate. 


“My good colleagues, 
 

As we conclude this session, I give my farewell and gratitude for having had the last ten years to serve as the presiding officer. I pledge to continuing serving with equal vigor from the backbenches. I have overseen the great power and growth of this institution. We must continue honoring our oath and pledging our commitment to the causes of our constituents. May my successor maintain such integrity and defend the rights of the Senate against abuse, corruption, malice, and injustice. 
 

I now motion to begin the vote and to have candidates rise to declare their intent to run and to cast their vote.”

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