Jump to content
Imperial_Office_of_Civil_Affairs

17th Imperial Diet, House of Commons (1775)

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Seventeenth Imperial House of Commons, 1775

fg9Ho9A8OzYiLdfTnNJX2Q9AnRsKZcSs0V9KvgPnHTCwbzuRBRn111nlleo0bn_TXmcGKYHSxL2Fyt2uANQXlxVv15lJVrTp-NuAtgE-Q4599Za6oN9V-EfQt2tqF8Jf4W6u9KNC

“Mr. President, your chair and gavel await you.”

 

Despite the applause that followed, the young Konstantin Wick wore a face schooled to stillness as he left the Josephite bench, and climbed the dais at the top of Varoche Hall. He paused, mid-step towards the President’s Chair, and glanced down the Hall. His eyes scanned each of those present, before he nodded decisively, and sat.

 

“I humbly thank you all wholeheartedly for the trust you have placed in me,” the President said resolutely, his voice echoing through the Hall. “I will not let you down.” With that, the roll was then called:

 

“Sir Konstantin Wick @Xarkly;

Mr. Jonah Stahl-Elendil @Braehn Elendil An'Hiraeth;

Mr. Lauritz Christiansen @Gusano;

Mr. Karl Amador @Sander;

Ms. Angelika Bykov @AnonymousAlexa;

Mr. George Galbraith @MrChenn1;

Mr. Lukas Rakoczy @Pureimp10;

Mr. Farooq Gray @Thatpyrodude;

Mr. Conrad Barclay @argonian;

Fr. Amadeus d’Aryn @Caranthir_;

Mr. Edward Napier @Hanrahan;

Mr; Padraig O’Rourke @Mandalore1.” 

 

As the Leader of the House called for all to rise, the newly-elected House of Commons stood, placing hands above hearts, their eyes turned expectantly to President Wick as he voiced the oath of office;

 

“I swear to be true to the Emperor and the realm and not to maintain silence about any evil that I may know which is being contemplated against them. I swear to work tirelessly to the betterment of the Empire and the Orenian people that comprise it. I swear also not to eat or drink with traitors and not to have anything in common with them, and always to defend the honor of the gentlemen I serve. This, I swear by the Holy Scrolls.”

 

The voices of the parliamentarians mingled into one proud drone, before silence fell again.

 

“Members of the House of Commons,” said President Wick, “You may take your seats.” He himself took the lead, before he rapped the gavel a single, resounding time. “I hereby call this sitting of the Seventeenth Imperial Diet to session.”

 

((This is a forum roleplay post. Only players with characters in the Commons and present in the room are able to reply.))

 

Edited by Imperial_Office_of_Civil_Affairs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SITTING OF THE 17TH IMPERIAL DIET

OWYN’S FLAME, 1775

 

Present:

Konstantin Wick;

Jonah Stahl-Elendil;

Lauritz Christiansen;

Karl Amador;

Angelika Bykov;

George Galbraith;

Lukas Rakoczy;

Farooq Gray;

Conrad Barlcay;

Edward Napier.

 

Absent:

Amadeus d’Aryn;

Padraig O’Rourke.

 


 

Sir Konstantin Wick: I now call this sitting of the 17th Imperial Diet to session.

 

Karl Amador: Permission to speak, Mr. President?

 

Sir Konstantin Wick: The Chair recognizes Mr. Amador.

 

Karl Amador: Two minor points, that'll be it. First off, we have four statues of our presiding civil servants outside the door, our past presidents Armas, Napier, May and Christiansen, who luckily still serves amongst us. But I propose that with President Stafyr having served and now you, these two busts are added as soon as possible.

 

Sir Konstantin Wick: The question may be put to the House, though the Chair will recognize Mr. Christiansen first.

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: As the one who purchased those busts in the first place, to commemorate the Senate when it was reformed, I do believe that the addition of these two new busts is currently… unnecessary, even if the work of Stafyr and Wick warrant it. The busts are not there to praise the work of individuals, but rather to commemorate an institution that no longer exists. Adding busts of Stafyr and Wick would not serve the purpose for which the busts were added in the first place, in my opinion. That is all.

 

Karl Amador: A valid point Mr. Christiansen, spasiba. Allow me to move onto the second, more important issue I wished to address? As you of course know, the two of us, Mr. Galbraith and Ms. Bykov were all invited to and present at a gathering hosted by Minister Galbraith to debate altering the process of impeachment. At the end of which we agreed to put forth a petition to the Emperor together, for the House to then vote upon. For those unaware, this regarded an amendment to the impeachment process to require a three fourths majority vote from the House of Commons in favor of initiating an impeachment process, as opposed to a simple majority vote. In the name of President Wick and my own, I'd like to officially put forth this issue and call for a vote on it unless debate is deemed necessary.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: Point of order.

 

Sir Konstantin Wick: I would be of the opinion, Mr. Amador, that it is best to draft a document detailing the proposed petition in full. The Chair recognizes Mr. Stahl-Elendil.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: I am of similar mind to you, Mr. President. There has been no formal proposal, nor informed debate by this chamber.

 

Angelika Bykov: Hear, hear!

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: Can we expect a proposal for the next hearing, Mr. Amador? Hopefully a bipartisan one, considering the nature of the topic.

 

Karl Amador: Of course, of course. I had hoped all would agree that this concerns such a minor and simple alteration that we could all agree with a simple vote to allow the President to petition the Emperor in our names. But I don't mind writing up the petition for the lot of us to have a look at. Consider it done for the next sitting.

 

Sir Konstantin Wick: The House will expect a petition regarding the procedure of impeachment at its next sitting, then. With that business concluded, the Chair calls upon the Leader of the House to set any proceeding business for this session.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: Thank you, Mr. President. If I may, a few words on our shared duty as legislators. The Edict of 1774 and the subsequent election must be seen for what it is; a wake up call. The partisanism of the last Diet left us with fewer laws that could have been, and unanswered questions regarding the nature of our state. While we in the Josephite bench are grateful to hold this majority once again, we are well aware of our duty in maintaining the collaborative nature of this body. I spoke to Mister Christiansen after the election, and I raised three questions that are currently on the minds of every citizen in this country. One, is what is the proper relationship between the government and the governed. The Imperial government and the provincial governments. The second regards how our taxes and obligations to our country benefit us today, and how they should tomorrow. The final question is in regards to how we break from the economic stagnation we now find ourselves in. The only way we can satisfy these questions is through compromise and collaboration. I am honored to serve with you all today, because I believe we will do just that. Expect the first round of legislation for our next meeting. With that, I yield the floor.

 

Sir Konstantin Wick: The Chair, and no doubt this House as a whole, echoes such sentiments. The Chair recognizes Mr. Gray.

 

Farooq Gray: A quick question for the Chair: when should we expect the State of the Empire?

 

Sir Konstantin Wick: I think that question is better directed to the Leader of the House.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: Thank you Mr. President, Mr. Amador. Archchancellor Basrid shall be invited to issue the state of the Empire next sitting. My apologies, Mr. Gray. Under regular and…properly paced circumstances, it would have been tonight. Yet the push for a new election from the cabinet made things a tad messy for everyone.

 

Karl Amador: Hear hear.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: I hope that answers your question. Now. Our last order of business is the standing orders. Seeing as we operate under new circumstances, they shall be amended to reflect the math of the House. Mister Amador, do you intend to serve as the Minority Leader?

 

Karl Amador: In the absence of Mr. d'Aryn, I will say yes.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: Very well.

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: Can I be the Minority Leader? I'm the true minority here, after all.

 

Karl Amador: Do not this is subject to change however.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: Of course it is. And I invite Mr. Christiansen to join us as well. You'll be sitting in and speaking for the Independent legislators when it comes to the standing orders.

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: Well, duh. I am the Independent legislator.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: Perhaps one day there'll be two. Anyways. With that, I yield. I move to adjourn this meeting, Mr. President.

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: Seconded.

 

Sir Konstantin Wick: If that concludes any questions or business, then I would like to affirm that I earnestly look forward to a productive Session. Let us challenge ourselves, let us debate, but let us always remain united in our dedication to the Orenian people. Let this be our best Session yet. Adjourned!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Padraig Padrick Seamus Kelly Michel David Donovan Tyrone William Patrick  Sean Pious O’Rourke votes for Wick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the Private Military Organization Bill of 1773, the Crown does grant assent.

 

On the Lex Criminalis Reform Bill of 1773, the crown will grant assent pending omission of all references to and provisions for indentured servitude.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SITTING OF THE 17TH IMPERIAL DIET

HOREN’S CALLING, 1776

 

Present:

Konstantin Wick;

Jonah Stahl-Elendil;

Lauritz Christiansen;

Karl Amador;

George Galbraith;

Lukas Rakoczy;

Conrad Barclay;

Farooq Gray;

Amadeus d’Aryn;

Edward Napier;

Padraig O’Rourke.

 

Absent:

Angelika Bykov.


 

Sir Konstantin: “Ahem. With eight members present and the Leader of the House on his way, this sitting of the 17th Imperial Diet is now in session. Before beginning - Mr. Christiansen, have you aligned yourself with the minority bench?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “No, but I believe that, according to Mr. D'Aryn, that it is meant to be set as precedent, that even if an independent is aligned with the majority, they sit on the other bench, as they are de jure not part of the government. Of course, if the President wishes to set a different precedent, I will switch benches. And go sit at the other side of the room. But I do believe the Mister d'Aryn makes sense.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “We can seek clarification from the author of the Amendment at a later date. In that regard, the Amendment is somewhat problematic. Regardless - in the absence of the Leader of the House, has he named someone to set the agenda today? Or can someone volunteer to do so on his behalf?”

 

George Galbraith: “Er- do we know how soon Elendil will be here?”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Yes, yes, Mr. Galbraith, go ahead. No point waiting.”

 

George Galbraith: “Oh, alright, then.”

 

[Mr. Conrad Barclay arrived].

 

George Galbrait: “Today, we have a multitude of bills on the docket, with the Sutican Relocation Bill, the Impeachment Amendment Bill, the Agricultural Revitalization Bill, the Legal Reforms, the Veterans Bill and the Parks Bill.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I will preface that by saying we are unlikely to hear all these Bills today, unless there is very little to debate.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, I do recognize such. If that is the case, we can simply go with the order of submission?”

 

Sir Konstantin: “With that said, the Chair calls upon the author of the Sutican Relocation Bill to present the bill before the House.”

 

Karl Amador: “Bykov is niet present.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Ah. Very well, then. The Chair then calls upon the author of the Impeachment Amendment Bill to present his bill before the House.”

 

Karl Amador: “Spasiba! I say we don't draw this out any longer than needed, so let me give a quick rundown. This Bill puts forth what was discussed last sitting as the petition to the Emperor to amend the impeachment verdict vote. Mr. Elendil brought it to my attention while we discussed it, that we didn't need to petition such. It can simply be done through a Bill, so here we are. As you can read, the only thing the Bill will do is change the vote of the Impeachment trial to a three fourths majority rather than a two thirds, as put forth as a bipartisan idea. That would be all, Mister President, I yield my time.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very good. Unmoderated debate is now in effect, and Members are invited to debate freely and respectfully.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “There is one thing I find problematic about this amendment. It is the fact that the votes required to put some into an office, such as the Secretary of Interior, or the Secretary of War, is just a plain majority of the House of Commons. If such is the case, then why must we need three-fourths to remove someone from office? Is the weight of those two actions not the very same? I believe it is. Someone should be assigned to office just as easily as they should be removed, and vice versa.”

 

Karl Amador: “If I may?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “One moment, Mister Amador.”

 

Farooq Gray: “How many people has this house confirmed? And how many has it impeached?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Many, and none, as of yet. Almost Secretary de Sarkozy back in the days of the Senate.”

 

Farooq Gray: “It's quite clear that one is a rare move that is only saved for the worst of times. So I see no issue in raising the bar, seeing as it is not equal to simply confirming a crown selection.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “The only difference between two-thirds and three-fourths is one vote.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “What I think we should consider is are we willing to give job security to someone who can hold a position indefinitely?”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Is it practical to add more power to just one vote?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Then that is another problem in and of itself, impeachment should be equal to confirming a crown selection. That is my firm belief. Anyway, Karl, you wanted the word, yes?”

 

Farooq Gray: “The Archchancellor is always free to remove a person from their role if they are not fit to it.”

 

Karl Amador: “I fully get Mister Christiansen's point and I believe it is worth looking into. It wasn't considered, as President Wick and I thought of this amendment during a meeting discussing the impeachment process, hence there's nothing about confirming people.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I find this agreeable.”

 

Conrad Barclay: “Eh, if I may….”

 

Karl Amador: “Very well, such will be addressed in the next session then. I yield the floor again for further questions or moving to a vote.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I move that rather than moving to a vote today. We table these rule changes until next session, giving us time to address the confirmation process. Do you find this agreeable, Mister Amador?”

 

Karl Amador: “I object, seeing how it doesn't change anything about this bill, and we've already got a lot of things to go through, I'd rather get it voted on to get it off of the to-do list.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I thought Mister Barclay wanted a word.”

 

Karl Amador: “And da, he did.”

 

Conrad Barclay: “Niet, nevermind. Continue on.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If you believe this to be the case, Mister Amador. Then I move to vote.”

 

Karl Amador: “Postponing it does niet change things, only slows us down, so I say we vote and look into the confirmation process for the next sitting. I second.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Seconded.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Are we in a hurry to impeach anyone?”

 

Karl Amador: “Niet that I know.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I'd rather us not be in a hurry to do that under any circumstances.”

 

Karl Amador: “But I wish to get us moving along since we have 5 more bills to discuss.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The question is heard and seconded, and we shall now proceed to a vote. I shall now call the roll; please vote by way or aye or nay.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Stahl-Elendil.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Nay.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Niet.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Gray.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Barclay.”

 

Conrad Barclay: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Nay.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Napier.”

 

Edward Napier: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. O'Rourke.”

 

Pádraig O'Rourke: “No.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “And I myself shall vote aye. With that, the ayes are seven, and majority is achieved. The bill is deemed, then, to be passed.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Amador and I shall reconvene at another date address to the confirmation process.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Chair then calls upon the author of the Agricultural Revitalization Bill to present his bill before the House.”

 

Karl Amador: “Very well, I say Mister Christiansen is also invited as he brought the matter up.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “This is a simple matter. I think it is prudent that the Agricultural sector of this country sees renewed growth. Especially since we are at war, our soldiers must be fed, and those lands will be ravaged. The content of the bill is simple. A landowner can request funding from the Imperial Treasury, either materials or marks, and then the Treasury may hand out at its discretion. If one does not use the funds appropriately, they will be found guilty of fraud, simple as. That is all, I yield.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very good. Unmoderated debate, then,” he chimed.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “So this is for private property, aye?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “It would be for private property, peerages and other landowners, such as the Galbraiths. I do believe the Imperial Treasury is free to spend its money and materials on public property as it desires, anyhow.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “For what the Imperial cabinet wants regarding agriculture and industry. I support it wholeheartedly.”

 

Karl Amador: “Hear hear.”

 

George Galbraith: “A quick question regarding the fraudulent clause.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Go on.”

 

George Galbraith: “So, let's say that a landowner does get the granted funds from the Treasury, and say he or she does not use such funds for agriculture. How exactly will you be able to assess if a fraudulent crime has been done, for example will you send surveyors to their respective land? Will you require them to provide subsequent land reports of their construction progress? I'd just like to see some more detail in that regard, if possible, and like Jonah, I do agree with the sentiments of the bill, it's a good start.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “A simple survey of the land would do. It is not hard to tell if there's a farm somewhere or if there's not.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I agree with Sir Lauritz, fraudulent behavior is determined by the treasury and or the constabulary investigating such matters.”

 

George Galbraith: “Would such be done by the Interior? If so, how often, and how would you determine whether significant construction is in progress?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “The Treasury should do it, not the Interior.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Hear hear.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, aye. But for the latter part of my question? Good point.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “The Treasury is the one to grant out those funds, and therefore it is up to their discretion whether sufficient construction is happening or not. Same principle as when it comes to giving out the funds in the first place, really. Common sense.”

 

George Galbraith: “I'd also like to see somewhat of a cost breakdown framework corresponding to the types of materials requested to assist the Treasury, but this shall do. That's all from me.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Motion for a vote.”

 

Karl Amador: “I second.”

 

George Galbraith: “Seconded.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Seconded.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The motion is heard,” Konstantin said in a sing-song voice, before he began listing off the roll. I shall vote aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Stahl-Elendil.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Gray.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Da.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Abstain”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Napier.”

 

Edward Napier: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. O'Rourke.”

 

Pádraig O'Rourke: “Yes.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Majority is achieved, and the bill is passed! This brings us nicely to the Christiansen Legal Reforms Bill. The author, whoever that may be, is called upon by the Chair to present his bill before the House.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Point of order.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Chair recognizes Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Mr. President, I hope you will agree with me that the naming of this bill is far too colloquial for public and legal consumption. I beg the chair to move that the author's surname be taken from this bill before it is sent to His Imperial Majesty. If it is.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If I may.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I concur with the honourable Fr. D'Aryn. Is this acceptable to Sir Christiansen?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “He spoke first, so I say that he can speak first.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Chair will recognize Mr. Stahl-Elendil, then.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Thank you Mr.President, Sir Christiansen. We in the majority propose a friendly amendment renaming the bill to 'Imperial Legal Reforms'. Does Sir Christiansen find the name acceptable?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “If I may - I am fine with the renaming of the bill. However, I do instead propose an alternate name, of much greater meaning and sentimentality. The Lemonade Legal Reforms of 1776, after the drink I was drinking but a moment ago.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “You're joking.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I don't like bills with boring names.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I second that.”

 

Edward Napier: “.. I vote Aye.”

 

Karl Amador: “I'm fine with eithers of his name proposals.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “At risk of breaking decorum, I do say…**** it, why not.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Yes, a good way to preserve decorum,” Konstantin grumbled at Jonah's language. “Are there any objections to Sir Christiansen's proposed amended name for the bill?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I do not hear any.”

 

Karl Amador: “I say we move to a vote on the Lemonade Legal Reforms.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I second.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I object.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “To the vote or to the name?”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “To the vote. I have no issue with the name.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I believe Sir Christiansen had not concluded his presentation of the matter.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I don't think I ever actually begun it, to be entirely honest.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Let us begin then, shite.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I'll make it quick. I am scrutinizing the Oren Revised Code for laws and such that can be amended or improved, these are simply the first batch of them all. To make it more simple and fair, generally. That is all, I yield.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Unmoderated debate is now in effect, gentlemen. Speak freely.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “The first section of the bill leaves some matters ambiguous. Matters that I believe warrant clarification, and potentially its own bill.”

 

Farooq Gray: “In my opinion these are all excellent changes, I fully support them.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Namely, a definition of what constitutes an armed militia.”

 

Pádraig O'Rourke: “Eh maybe.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Therefore, I would propose that an amendment be made to the bill, to strike section one from it and introduce it at a later date as its own separate bill.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I, personally, do not have an issue with it becoming a separate bill. If it means the rest of the bill will pass, that is.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I take no issue with the rest of the bill.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Though, I do believe it precedent that amendments be… voted on?”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The author of the bill accepts the amendment. Not voted on. So it's your call, Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “When did that become precedent? What an awful one.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Do you agree to the amendment, Sir Christiansen?”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Last term, with President Stafyr's moderation.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Hm.” He then lifted his shoulders in a shrug. “Yes, I'll accept the amendment, then work on a more detailed bill in regard to section one. I propose that we vote.”

 

George Galbraith: “Seconded.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The motion is heard, and the roll will now be called. I shall vote aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Stahl-Elendil.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Gray.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Napier.”

 

Edward Napier: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. O'Rourke.”

 

Pádraig O'Rourke: “Nah.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very good. Majority is achieved, and the bill passed.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The author of the Imperial Parks Act is called upon by the Chair to present his bill before the House.”

 

Edward Napier: “The Imperial Parks bill - in a very short summary, shall endeavor to create both spaces, and the legislation for which to both establish and protect them. Many a time has short-sighted settlement and industry destroyed unique natural sights in this fair earth. How many villages, now abandoned, lay over fine meadows or goodly forests? Through both the Ministry of Interior, and the Provincial governments, the ability to create non-tamperable spaces would be given.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “If that concludes the presentation, then unmoderated debate is now in effect.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Would you mind explaining this one section, Mr Napier? Section three, points one and two.”

 

Edward Napier: “Ah. As the designation of one of these things is very serious business - I wrote that the Ministry of the Interior, as well as the Provincial Government must both co-approve the creation of a park. As to the secondary point, err..”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “These points seem to contradict each other.”

 

Edward Napier: “… How do you mean?”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I'm simply confused as to who determines whether a park is created or not?”

 

Edward Napier: “Oh, goodness. The First point.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “In the first point you say the Secretary of the Interior and the Provincial government.”

 

Edward Napier: “… Oh, yes! My apologies. I'm a bit dishevelled, but for creating an -external- park, such as one outside of the Empire, it would require House support.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “So that second point applies only to external parks?”

 

Edward Napier: “Correct, yes.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I see.”

 

Edward Napier: “I've just made the correction.”

 

Karl Amador: “I've a question.”

 

Edward Napier: “Indeed.”

 

Karl Amador: “Could you name some examples of areas you have in mind to be turned into Parks?”

 

Edward Napier: “Ah, yes, ah..”

 

Karl Amador: “For I believe there's a few sizeables areas that see no occupation or use at all, only some small bits of land come to mind. Might just be me though, so please inform me.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The Curon landscar comes to mind.”

 

Edward Napier: “Indeed. For example, although a landscar - if turned into a park..”

 

Karl Amador: “Good one actually… Forgot we still had that.”

 

Edward Napier: “Funds and business would go about planting trees, terraforming, and transforming it into a pleasant, natural place. Unique Beauties.”

 

Karl Amador: “Hmm...Question.”

 

Edward Napier: “Indeed.”

 

Karl Amador: “Another one, da. Would it be possible for some buildings or institutions to sit within a Park if such is agreed upon with the formation of the Park? Say, a large forest which only has a castle in it, which is in use.”

 

Edward Napier: “It would be, yes! There would ideally be facilities. The main purpose is to avoid intensive development, business development. Lumber Mills, farmlands, etc, But a few cabins or a tavern is not a problem, and in fact encouraged.”

 

Karl Amador: “So these would not need to be removed if already present? Because I see the bill says they're fine to be constructed there with the Commissioner's approval, but nothing about them staying there.”

 

Edward Napier: “They may have to be removed - but, as in all life, exceptions can be made for individual cases, I believe.”

 

Karl Amador: “Da, I know. But I don't see those exceptions included in the bill. I'd recommend adding such in. That's all.”

 

Edward Napier: “Such exceptions are awkward to include - as it is difficult to write for the random situations of life..”

 

Karl Amador: “I meant putting in a line about the possibility for exceptions to be made to removal of structures if such is agreed upon by all parties involved.”

 

Edward Napier: “Aha. That, I can amend, Mr. Amador.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Good God, how many problems are there with this bill? Can we just get the vote on?”

 

Karl Amador: “I'm fine with moving to a vote.”

 

Edward Napier: “Aye. May we, Mr. President?”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The motion is heard and seconded. The roll will now be called. I shall vote aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Stahl-Elendil.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Nay.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Da..”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Gray.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Present.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Abstention.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Napier.”

 

Edward Napier: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “And Mr. O'Rourke appears to have left us. Majority is not achieved, and so the vote shall be concluded by way of absentee voting.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “With that, the Chair calls upon Mr. Gray to present his bill.”

 

Farooq Gray: “I am presenting the Protecting our Veterans Act. We are about to enter a brutal war, some of our soldiers will die, others will be unable to work again. This bill will ensure they are able to afford basics, such as food and a bed. We must do our part protecting them when they return home, while they do their part protecting us. With that, I've nothing further.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Unmoderated debate is now in effect and Members may speak freely.”

 

Karl Amador: “I've something to add, Mister Gray.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Hmm?”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, I'd like to add something, after Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “With the ongoing Scyfling war in Haense, it has become very clear to me that not all those who fight in a conflict are members of the armed forces. Many are ordinary men, women and children wishing to give their all for their nation in times of trouble. I say that an amendment is made to include them too, if they fit Section I, subsection II.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Perhaps it should say 'those involved in armed services or partake in a military engagement'? Makes sure that we cover the bases in regards to civilian auxiliaires.”

 

Karl Amador: “If they fit Subsection II, but weren't in the armed forces, they still deserve to be aided with this bill in my opinion.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Can the treasury even afford this pension?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Adding everyone who's fought in a battle in their lifetime to the pensions will bleed the coffers dry in a matter of days.”

 

George Galbraith: “We'd have to see a rough estimate of a number to decide that, perhaps an audit would help.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Nay, it would be impossible to police this and would include far too many people. Perhaps in the future something like this may be added, but for now we must focus on protecting our men who actually served in a formal military.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Hear, hear!”

 

Farooq Gray: “This bill will be affordable and cover those that need it, a moderate gain for the greater good of the country. If there is nothing further, perhaps we ought to move to a vote.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “ … Are there further questions for the honourable Mr. Gray?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I second the motion to vote.”

 

Karl Amador: “A fair point.. I would motion to move to a vote.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “If not, I myself must express some concern for the treasury's capacity in this regard.”

 

Farooq Gray: “I would point out, Sir Konstantin, that it would require quite a long service in order to be eligible, and they would only receive 25% of a

three year average of their salary.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Did you draft this bill with official treasury figures, Mr. Gray? Or with the consultation of the treasury in any regard?”

 

George Galbraith: “Not that I know of.”

 

Farooq Gray: “I had access to the budget when it was created, aye.”

 

George Galbraith: “Oh, including the inflow and outflow expenditures? Or just the budget for each ministry.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I believe an idea of figures may be helpful to allow the House to reach a fair and informed vote.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, a rough estimate might help. If pensions cannot be agreed to, I may have another idea or amendment for Mr. Gray's bill.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Initial expenses would not be more than a few thousand marks from my rough audit. Would be a decade before most would qualify. I would expect many would fail to claim in this initial batch.”

 

Karl Amador: “Sounds like the expenditures won't be too crazy.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “ … Hrm. I see. Are there further questions for the honourable Mr. Gray?”

 

George Galbraith: “Hm. I do have another idea, perhaps for the bill.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very good, speak up then, Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “I'm not completely aware if areas of Haense or Kaedrin do this, so forgive me if I'm wrong, but in Helena we give 50% off taxes for housing to former and current ISA members.”

 

Karl Amador: “I do not believe such is done in Haense.”

 

George Galbraith: “Perhaps a similar metric could be mandated or at least encouraged to be standardized.”

 

Farooq Gray: “I do not want to pack too much into this bill. Small improvements over time. I motion to call this bill to question.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Seconded.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very well. The question will now be put to the House. I shall abstain.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Stahl-Elendil.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye!”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “Abstain.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Gray.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Majority is not achieved, and the matter shall be decided by way of absentee voting. OH. My apologies, Mr. Napier.”

 

Edward Napier: Aye.

 

Karl Amador: “I do believe the majority is achieved, is it not?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Who was that?”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The tally rests at six ayes, and so will require one absentee vote to achieve a majority.”

 

Karl Amador: “Ah of course.”

 

Farooq Gray: “Is that all then? I grow sleepy after such a long sitting.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Almost done.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Almost, Mr. Gray. That concludes our mountain of bills for today, but the Chair will now call upon the Leader of the House on the

matter of the Standing Orders.”

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “As I have worked out with Mister Amador and Mister Christiansen, adjustments to the orders are needed to make the math of the Chamber make sense. Full introduction shall happen next week, but in order to function in the meanwhile. We shall name the Chairmen of the Committees. We in the Josephite bench name Grey Galbraith as Chairman of Ways & Means, Padraig O'Rourke as Chairman of the Interior, and Sir Lauritz Christiansen as Chairman of the Judiciary. I invite the Minority Leader to announce the ranking members of each committee.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “I will send the names to the President with great haste. Thank you.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Eeeeexceeeellleeeent. Unless there is any further business to be raised impromptu …?” He glanced around at them.

 

Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “With that, I yield. Thank you all, gentlemen.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “This session is forthwith adjourned. Be safe on the roads, gentlemen.”

 


 

 

VOTE ON

THE IMPEACHMENT AMENDMENT ACT

 

AYE

Wick

Stahl-Elendil

Amador

Galbraith

Barclay

Gray

Napier

 

NAY

Christiaensen

Rakoczy

d’Aryn

O’Rourke

 

ABSENT

Bykov

 

The vote has achieved majority and the bill is passed.


 

VOTE ON

THE AGRICULTURAL REVITALIZATION ACT

 

AYE

Wick

Stahl-Elendil

Christiansen

Amador

Galbraith

Rakoczy

Barclay

Gray

Napier

O'Rourke

 

ABSTAIN

d’Aryn

 

ABSENT

Bykov

 

The vote has achieved majority and the bill is passed.


 

VOTE ON

THE LEMONADE LEGAL REFORMS

 

AYE

Wick

Stahl-Elendil

Christiansen

Amador

Galbraith

Rakoczy

Barclay

Gray

d'Aryn

Napier

 

NAY

O’Rourke

 

ABSENT

Bykov

 

The vote has achieved majority and the bill is passed.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VOTE ON

THE IMPERIAL PARKS ACT

 

AYE

Wick

Stahl-Elendil

Amador

Galbraith

Rakoczy

Napier

 

NAY

Christiaensen

 

ABSTAIN

Gray

d’Aryn

 

UNDECIDED

Bykov

Barclay

O’Rourke

 

Those undecided shall have twenty-four Saint’s Hours from now to cast their ballot by way of absentee voting. The bill requires ONE absentee vote to achieve majority.

 


 

 

VOTE ON

THE PROTECTING OUR VETERANS ACT

 

AYE

Stahl-Elendil

Christiansen

Amador

Gray

d’Aryn

Napier

 

ABSTAIN

Wick

Galbraith

 

UNDECIDED

Bykov

Rakoczy

Barclay

O’Rourke

 

Those undecided shall have twenty-four Saint’s Hours from now to cast their ballot by way of absentee voting. The bill requires ONE absentee vote to achieve majority.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To the Agricultural Revitalization Bill of 1776, the Crown does grant assent.

The Lemonade Legal Reforms and Impeach Amendment Bill are sent to the House of Lords for review, given their contents proposing change to succession law and the Edict of Reform respectively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Angelika Bykov proudly votes AYE for all bills presented.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SITTING OF THE 17TH IMPERIAL DIET, HOUSE OF COMMONS

TOBIAS’ BOUNTY, 1776

 

Present

Wick

Christiansen

Amador

Galbraith

Bykov

Rakoczy

D’Aryn

O’Rourke (partially)

 

Absent

Stahl-Elendil

Barclay

Gray

Napier

 


 

Sir Konstantin: “I … hereby call this sitting of the 17th Imperial Diet to session. The Chair calls upon the acting Leader of the House to set the agenda.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Ah, have uh, on behalf of Mister Stahl-Elendil, been called upon to act as the, uh… Leader of the House today. I have decided that we will…Start with a minute of silent prayer, to mourn the passing of King Sigismund II of Haense. That minute starts now.” He said with a nod, folding his hands in prayer and turned his gaze to the floor.

 

[A minute of silence was observed.]

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “We will now proceed with the four bills that are on the floor today. Firstly, the Sutican Relocation Bill by Angelika Vanir. Angelika, you may proceed with the presentation of the bill.” He said, offering her a nod.

 

Angelika Bykov: “Prevja. In short, this bill shall provide refuge for Suticans who wish to flee their war-torn and tyrranous state. The bill shall create a program led by the Ministry of the Interior in assisting these refugees and settling them into the Empire. If you do not posses the act, it shall be passed around now. I now stand open for any questions.”

 

[The President excused himself momentarily.]

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Unmoderated debate will now proceed as usual.”

 

George Galbraith: “First, I'd like to thank Angelika for such a well written and intended bill for those who suffer under the wrath of the Sutican tyrant. I have more of a clarifying question, will these refugees first temporarily be placed into a room in the poorhouse until they do choose to buy a house in the Empire?”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Why, thank you, Mr. Galbraith. Frankly, this is up to the refugee themself. If they have the appropriate funds to purchase a home, then I would encourage them to do so. On the other hand, if they do not, then da, the poorhouse would be an adequate temporary home.”

 

George Galbraith: “Alright, and perhaps the Treasury could give discounts or small grants for refugees who seek to buy a house? I'd presume it'd help to settle them in more properly from quite the transition.

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Perhaps cheaper housing should be built.”

 

Padraig O'Rourke: “I have a concern. ‘ow we gunna tell de gud from de bad in dis?”

 

Karl Amador: “I've another concern. How much actual demand is there for this?”

 

Angelika Bykov: “I think that would be an excellent idea, Mr. Galbraith! If this bill does pass, then we can most certainly work out a program. Well, in my opinion, the more people within Oren, the better for our economy. And Mr. Amador, why don't you step into the shoes of a Sutican? Da, their population is…sparse, though if I were living in such a corrupt state, I would certainly want to migrate to our fair Empire. I think that would be an excellent idea, Mr. Galbraith! If this bill does pass, then we can most certainly work out a program. Mr. O’Rourke -  in my opinion, the more people within Oren, the better for our economy. And Mr. Amador, why don't you step into the shoes of a Sutican? Da, their population is…sparse, though if I were living in such a corrupt state, I would certainly want to migrate to our fair Empire.”

 

George Galbraith: “I do agree with Padraig, though, what exactly is our system to vet them, just in case some of them may be spies? Obviously, there do exist refugees seeking help, but you never know if there are one or two planted.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “What will they do just by buying a house in Helena?”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “The Honourable Lady presents us with a well-intentioned piece on the corruption of the Sutican state, but this is not effective legislation. Would the Honourable Lady tell me if she has any experience with the city state? I can tell you, these people live in large housing much larger than our own. I do not think they would give such a thing up for a place in the poorhouse.”

 

Karl Amador: “I do not believe Sutica is as much of a corrupt and undesirable state as our imperial propaganda suggests it to be. I project there'll be very few if any Suticans moving here.”

 

George Galbraith: “You call the Sutican tyrant benching and taking out his council 'propoganda', Karl? Or their cries for help?”

 

Padraig O'Rourke: “Ah sure wish we uh kept dem Sons of Malin lads 'round t'ey could of sorted de gud from de bad.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Not only do I agree with my Honourable Friend Mr. Amador in that I doubt there will be any demand for this slightly redundant bill, but I think that granting citizens of a nation we are currently in a state of war with a path to Orenian citizenship is dan.”

 

Karl Amador: “Hear hear.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “What possible harm could happen?”

 

Karl Amador: “Covert actions.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Spying on the tavern? /Oh my/.”

 

Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye fecking assassinations and the like.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Of course, that is a concern, Mr. Galbraith. Though as I mention, all refugees shall undergo strict screening, ideally by the ISA to ensure that they are not spies.” She then set her gaze on Amadeus. “I most certainly would. If my King was a tyrant and a murderer, I would most certainly not want to live in his state.”

 

Karl Amador: “In my skeptical view, all this bill will do is give the possibility for Sutican spies and other undesirables to go sniffing around here.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Anyone could be a spy. It is the responsibility of the ISA and the Ministry of Intelligence to discover them. But to withhold life-saving refuge out of fear that one of dozens might be a spy is foolish.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Precisely. Hear, hear!”

 

George Galbraith: “Hear, hear. This bill is a good support mechanism for those who are oppressed.”

 

Padraig O'Rourke: “Now luike 'ere ah may not 'ave all de learnin ye lot gut, but to me it sounds luike us opening de Hen House at night.”

 

Karl Amador: “If I may explain my view?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Amador, go on. Wait.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Then you certainly do not know the Sutican appetite, Ms. Bykov.” He nodded, “I would like to turn the attention of the House to Section III of the bill in which it states that refugees have the opportunity to purchase a home and register for citizenship within the empire. Are we to say that within months of this bill's passage we could have Sutican's, who we do not know the intentions of, running and voting in our elections?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Oops not my job.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “I give way to my Honourable Friend.” 

 

Karl Amador: “First of all, Miss Bykov, I do not doubt the rightful and just intensions of this bill, let that be clear. But here's why I am skeptical of it and will vote against it. The Sutican Trade Prince hasn't just recently come to power, he's been in his position for some time now. f there were Suticans who really wanted to flee his kind of government, they will already have fled.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Or perhaps they have not been given the opportunity to, Mr. Amador?”

 

Karl Amador: “Why would they not have been given the opportunity? What would have obstructed such?”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Indeed, I know Sutica well enough as its Cardinal to understand that the people of the city are fiercely loyal to the state, any who accept our hand of friendship would seek to subvert us from within. I lament if the Sutican shall get the vote.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Perhaps fear of their ruler. Fear that they would be next.”

 

Karl Amador: “Nonsense. I've been to Sutica recently, all was well and calm there, no sign of fear whatsoever. No oppression or anything of the likes to be seen. Now furthermore, Miss Bykov. If there were these supposed Sutican Refugees. I do not doubt they would've come here even without this bill. Not to mention that you say 'these people don't have the opportunity to flee Sutica' and this bill does nothing to change that. If, according to you, these people cannot flee Sutica due to whatever circumstances, there won't be any refugees for this bill to have an effect on. Meaning its useless if you stand by your remark. Lastly, all this bill will do because of the lack of genuine refugees is give the opportunity for Sutican undesirables to come sniffing around here like I said.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Honourable Members will note,” Konstantin added after Karl finished, “that we have spent a considerable time debating this Bill. If criticisms cannot be resolved, the Chair suggest tabling. Elsewise we shall proceed to a vote.”

 

Karl Amador: “Not to mention other undesirables from other places who will claim to be from Sutica.”

 

George Galbraith: “I motion to proceed to vote after Mr. Amador finishes his statements.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Seconded.”

 

Karl Amador: “This bill will be useless and a waste of money, time, effort and resources. I yield.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “I issue my objection to this motion Mr. President. The Honourable Members of the House should understand the difficulty of redundant bills, oftimes branded as 'flavourful'. The House must understand that by so much as presenting such farces that we do demean the legislative capabilities of this body and institution. I would advise Members opposite to oppose this bill. Ms. Bykov may trust the intentions of a people we are at bitter war with, but I do not.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “To be clear, Fr. D'Aryn, you oppose the motion on matters of, ah, integrity?”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Mr. President, I oppose the bill on the grounds of its poor legislative capacity and its subversion of imperial authority. To be clear, I will vote against this and will oppose any motion to take it to a vote. I commend this statement and beg the house to deny the bill.” He sat back down.

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr President, I motion we move to a vote.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Seconded.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Mr. President, I motion to table this bill.”

 

George Galbraith: “Are we at war with the tyrant himself? Or the people, there is a difference.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “We are at war with the tyrant. I wish to aid the innocent people.”

 

George Galbraith: “Exactly.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “We are at war with a state and a people who will fight us tooth and nail, people who you will let into the heart of our empire with open arms.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Needless to say, I was absent for the beginning of this debate, and I intervene only on matters of clarity.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Please do not be foolish enough to believe that the Sutican king is a product of anything but his own nation. I have been there, I have been with them.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “A motion to proceed to a vote has been seconded.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “And a motion to table the bill still stands.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Not open arms. Cautious arms, more like.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “ … Such as this one. Before concluding this debate, I might ask the author as to what the 'Refugee Programme' actually entails. Is it simply the latter half of Article II and that of Article III?”

 

Karl Amador: “I second Fr. D'Aryn's motion.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Da. The refugee program is simply to assist Suticans and bring them into Oren to provide them with a better life.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “A motion now exists to proceed to a vote and to table the bill.” He said, rising, “I beg the President to weigh in on this matter.”

 

Karl Amador: “Miss Bykov, I highly suggest that you somehow make an effort to go looking around in Sutica.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “During a time of war?”

 

Karl Amador: “The people there seem to be just fine with their leader who you condemn a tyrant.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The motion to vote, Fr. D'Aryn, was seconded prior to your motion. Though I myself am admittedly skeptical regarding refugees being able to vote without any substantial time period ….”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “If you cannot stomach going to Sutica with the people then I suggest that you do not stomach us taking them in.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I find there are insufficient grounds to label this Bill as a subversion of Imperial authority. Sir Konstantin: “Thus, the Chair hears the question and we shall now proceed to a vote. The roll will now be called.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I shall abstain.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Uh, ah.. I think.. Nay.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador:NIET.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Ms. Bykov.”

 

Angelika Bykov:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy:Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn:Nay.”

 

Sir Konstantin:Majority is not achieved and the matter shall be concluded by way of absentee voting. With that, the Chair calls upon the acting Leader of the House to raise our next matter.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I call upon Mister George Galbraith to present his bill. The Imperial Business Funding Bill, that is.”

 

George Galbraith: “To be concise, this bill serves as a good mechanism to revitalize the Loan Office and provide a good system to start up new and existing businesses, to flourish our economy.t provides a good system to ved credible business owners who are interested in loans.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Speak freely, unmoderated debate is now in effect.”

 

Karl Amador: “Mister Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “Mister Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “When you campaigned you said you wished to support Small Business, saying you were in agreement with me. When you say support them financially though, I assumed you spoke of subsidies like the rest of us, niet loans.”

 

George Galbraith: “And the concern you raise?”

 

Karl Amador: “Anybody can get a loan already, they just need to talk to someone like Miss Carrington. Few people are willing to take loans however, and oftentimes these loans are not or inadequately paid back. As for subsidies on the other hand.”

 

George Galbraith: “Ah, which leads into my next point, thank you, Karl.”

 

Karl Amador: “They do much more to enrich our small businesses, it doesn't indebt them. Not to mention they actively encourage aspiring entrepreneurs to get into Small Business. While loans do not. Subsidies give small business owners a guarantee that, even if sales aren't great, if they can show their business model is sound, they can still survive off of their business for a while.”

 

George Galbraith: “You raise practical concerns, Karl, I wouldn't blame you. But I think this bill just does address said concerns. First, let's talk about loans not being payed back. Well that's where Section II comes into place, which such a supported vetting process and system to ensure that we loan money to /credible/ business owners.”

 

Karl Amador: “Without needing to endebt themselves to someone.”

 

George Galbraith: “Second, is responsibility to the Treasury. You talk about small businesses eventually being indebted, but that's just the result of bad loan negotiations with private lenders. That's why we set up such a supported system in the Treasury.”

 

Karl Amador: “Eventually being indebted. Upon taking a loan, you are indebted.”

 

George Galbraith: “The Imperial Treasury is professional enough to negotiate the best prices and /feasible/ loans to small businesses.”

 

Karl Amador: “That's how loans and debt work.”

 

George Galbraith: “That can be feasibly paid back. Of course, the price will be managed and negotiated to what the small business can afford, I'd actually like you to look at Section II. We ask for things like financial statements. That work towards setting a good and feasible loan price. Now, let's talk about subsidies.”

 

Karl Amador: “Da, let's.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “The Honourable Members fail to see the overriding point that we are in a total war with an already limited budget, we cannot be as fiscally irresponsible with handouts as we were in the past.”

 

George Galbraith: “So far, I believe what I've said have addressed your earlier two points. And I'll get to you later, FR. D'Aryn. Now, subsidies.”

 

Karl Amador: “You said that, get on with it please.”

 

George Galbraith: “Giving out handouts for a one time installment with subsidies may not be as sustaining as loans. What I mean is, we can just give small businesses money, but how do we actually know that would be put to good use in the long term? Setting up a loan sets  the goal of a business to pay back said feasible loan, creating an automatic incentive to make sure their business is productive. Now, to FR d'Aryns point. You say limited budget? But this has already been discussed with Mr. Mane, and he has expressed that this plan is feasible. We've already halved the Imperial Treasury budget, and we've already started raising a /substantial/ amount of war bonds for the  war effort. You say the past loans have been irresponsible? I agree with you, and that's why this system does such a good job of enforcing responsible loan contracts?”

 

Karl Amador: “Well isn't that nice Galbraith? On every bill that concerns money.”

 

George Galbraith: “If you'd just look to Section II and Section III.”

 

Karl Amador: “You remark that the Treasury has a limited budget and that we are niet swimming in money.”

 

George Galbraith: “Enforcement right there.”

 

Karl Amador: “Yet with your own bill, there's suddenly enough money to make it work.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I don't recall the deficit being an issue when pensions were considered.”

 

Karl Amador: “Then you recall wrongly I am afraid.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “I do not disagree with your system, Mr. Galbraith, but in what way does the Treasury already not have the powers to issue such loans? Should this not be a matter for committee to test the Minister on? Should we not be asking for his initiatives, rather than giving him our own?”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I was here. I brought up the deficit.”

 

George Galbraith: “That's simply because the pensions will have more expenditure than this system.”

 

Karl Amador: “Mister Galbraith did in fact raise the concern that we could niet give pensions to too many people, because of the budget deficit.”

 

George Galbraith: “We negotiate prices for loans, that will tend to be lower because they are /small/ businesses. Unlike the pensions, which are numerous higher than this system. There's a difference, Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Of course there is.”

 

George Galbraith: “I only raised such an issue because that system expends more money than this one ever will.”

 

Karl Amador: “Let me tell you though, George. This policy may look very pretty on paper. But in practice, pretty much nobody will actually take up the offer unless we actively work to shove it under their noses.”

 

George Galbraith: “And I agree. Perhaps you should take more time to read Section II and III.”

 

Karl Amador: “And even then most will be reluctant to actually take out a loan.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “So then why are you concerned about a budget deficit…?”

 

George Galbraith: “That is false. I've actually received a number of requests to revitalize the Loan Office.”

 

Karl Amador: “I am not concerned about a budget deficit, Miss Bykov.”

 

George Galbraith: “Small businesses have started flourishing, and people have started to register with the ICR as well, and companies have expressed interest in getting loans.”

 

Karl Amador: “I said it was funny that mister Galbraith is always concerned about a budget deficit, except for when it comes to a bill of his own.”

 

George Galbraith: “To name one, Dubois and Co. I've already addressed that, Karl. Stop repeating yourself.”

 

Karl Amador: “I beg your pardon? I was answering Miss Bykov. I'd prefer if you left such an attitude at home, Mister Galbraith. II've already addressed your concern relating to me 'switching sides'. Yes, you have. Again, I was answering Bykov.”

 

George Galbraith: “It makes no sense to repeat the same argument if it already has been addressed. Any other questions?”

 

Karl Amador: “Yes, when will you step down?”

 

George Galbraith: “I motion we move to a vote.”

 

Karl Amador: “There were more questions. I object to moving to a vote.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “I second the motion.”

 

Karl Amador: “Spasiba miss Bykov.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Niet, for Mr. Galbraith's motion.”

 

Karl Amador: “I am aware..”

 

Sir Konstantin: “If there are no further questions, we may proceed. Otherwise, we have enough time to entertain more questions.”

 

Karl Amador: “Well I had plenty more questions.”

 

George Galbraith: “Then do go ahead.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Proceed, Mr. Amador. Though I would remind both of you to act with the composure this House requires.”

 

Karl Amador: “Oh? When I first said I had more questions you ignored me and motioned for a vote….”

 

George Galbraith: “I apologize. You may proceed.”

 

Karl Amador: “So I'd like if Mister Galbraith actually listened to his colleagues rather than ignoring them and going on a rant about how they keep repeating themselves.. Mister Galbraith, would you be opposed to introducing Small Business subsidies on top of these loans?”

 

George Galbraith: “Perhaps in a later revision. I think what we have now is a good start to test the system.”

 

Karl Amador: “Because as it stands, I do believe subsidies are astronomically more effective than loans in a multitude of ways. For one. Say times are tough for an entrepreneur. What would aid him more? Some yearly subsidies that'll just about keep him afloat? Or the option to take a loan, endebt himself and risk not being able to pay back said loan. I fully agree with you that we need to support small businesses.”

 

George Galbraith: “Good hypothetical, Karl. But I think that's where we need to look at this system. See, taking into account such financial statements, the Treasury would obviously negotiate a price that could be feasibly paid back.”

 

Karl Amador: “But offering loans is not the way.”

 

George Galbraith: “And unlike subsidies, where they might just keep asking for amounts of money. A feasible loan provides a contractual obligation. That not only they can pay back but-. Actually incentivizes them more to productively operate their business.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Agreed. I don't find it fundamentally right for a government to simply hand out money.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, thus the contractual obligation.”

 

Karl Amador: “I disagree. See. Small businesses are not just a part of our economy. They are a service.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “What guarantees can the Honourable Member make in ensuring this initiative if enacted will keep the confidence of the House, will Mr. Galbraith stake his honour against it? Can he ensure us it will be an efficient system that he will help to oversee?”

 

Karl Amador: “They provide work to the unemployed and goods and other services to citizens. Now it is completely natural and should only be encouraged.”

 

George Galbraith: “That's what the Treasury is there for, they'll be primarily responsible for such oversight.”

 

Karl Amador: “For a government to invest in its services to the people. I say that it is unjust for the Treasury to simply profit off of trying to help people provide a service to the citizens of the empire. It is worth handing out money for. Because by handing out that money. Our economy grows. And our citizens get this vital service supplied to them.”

 

George Galbraith: “So, you say it is morally irresponsible to produce loans by an Imperial service?”

 

Karl Amador: “In greater amounts than before.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “But, Mr. Galbraith, I am asking for your personal promise to stake your reputation against the success of this here programme of legislation. As I trust your judgement, if you do give me such ensurances that it will aid small businesses in a visible way, then I shall vote aye.”

 

Karl Amador: “In this specific case, yes Mister Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “I see it as less of the Treasury leeching off profit and more of creating an obligation through a loan that the business will put this money to profit themselves. The fact that they need to pay it back creates such an incentive.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Interest rates provide guarentees for the loaner. It is not irresponsible.”

 

George Galbraith: “Unlike a subsidy.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Gentlemen, with respect to our remaining business, we shall conclude debate in five minutes.”

 

Karl Amador: “Of course, in normal circumstances it would niet be irresponsible. But in this circumstance it's different. We're not talking about a bank or a person giving out a loan, we speak of the government. I would be completely on board with these loans. If there was no interest in them.”

 

George Galbraith: “Well, a loan inherently contains interest.”

 

Karl Amador: “Interest in this case only hampers economic growth. It does not in fact, George.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “I agree with Mr Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Let me be the one to inform you, George. Asking interest on a loan is a sin in the Canonist faith. Look it up if you do not believe me. It's called usury.”

 

George Galbraith: “I think I'll look it up.”

 

Karl Amador: “It is our duty as good Canonists to aid out our brothers when they are in need. But that aid should be taken for granted. Not be subject to profit.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Mr. Amador, I believe the sin of usury only applies to unreasonable rates of interest.”

 

Karl Amador: “Loans without interest would do what the loan is intended to do; help entrepreneurs.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, I believe that's the application of /unreasonable rates/. Not any rate.”

 

Karl Amador: “More So than loans with interest.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Gentlemen please let us not rope the Holy Mother Church into this..” The clergyman pleaded with a tilted head and outstretched hands.

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, I agree with Fr. D'Aryn, we shouldn't be using the Holy Church as an agenda.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Mr. Galbraith, will you give me those assurances that I previously sought?”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Regardless, I do not believe it should be the government's agenda to make money out of helping small businesses.”

 

Karl Amador: “Agreed.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Government loans must be purely to stimulate business.”

 

Karl Amador: “Hear hear.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Loans with interest still help entrepreneurs.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye, they aren't unreasonable rates.”

 

Karl Amador: “Less than loans without interest though. They help them more.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “On that note, I would suggest Mr. Galbraith takes these comments under advisement and the bill be tabled. Elsewise, there must be a motion to vote. We have succeeded our allotted time for this matter and have other business to discuss.”

 

George Galbraith: “I motion to vote.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Seconded.”

 

Karl Amador: “Mister Galbraith, would you be willing to amend your bill to ensure it concerns loans without interest?”

 

George Galbraith: “I'll allow it.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “So no more interest on any loans offered by this bill?”

 

George Galbraith: “Then, I'd like to motion to vote on the bill with this amendment.”

 

Karl Amador: “Then I motion we vote on the bill, taken the amendment that the loans are without any interest. Ah, seconded.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very well. With that amendment made, the question is heard and seconded. The roll shall now be called.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I will vote aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Ms. Bykov.”

 

Angelika Bykov:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy:Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn:Abstain.”

 

Sir Konstantin:Majority is not achieved, then, and the matter shall be concluded by way of absentee voting.”

 

[The bill was later passed when Mr. O’Rourke arrived and voted.]

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Chair calls on the acting Leader of the House to raise our final bill for today.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Yes, yes. Ah, I call upon Sir Lauritz Christiansen to present his Adoption Bill. Ah, that'd be me. This bill is simple. It creates a legal way for someone to adopt a person under the age of majority that has no parents or guardian. This will create a simple and swift system, which is also fair, and supervised by the courts. There, is, ah, not much else to say.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “I motion to move for a vote.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Chair thinks it appropriate to first hear any questions. If there are any such questions, unmoderated debate is now in effect and Members are invited to speak freely. If there is not, the Chair shall hear Fr. D'Aryn's question. Is there a second?”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Seconded.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very good. The roll shall now be called.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I shall vote aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “The Honourable Member will know of my enthusiasm towards this proposed bill. We have seen in the Holy Scrolls an example of an uncle adopting his nephew. Thank you, Mr. Christiansen, for introducing this.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Ms. Bykov.”

 

Angelika Bykov:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy:Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “We shall determine that matter in a moment, pending Mr. Amador's return from the privy.”

 

Karl Amador:Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: Majority is achieved, and the bill is passed. Ahem. Like I said, the standing committees ….”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “We still have more bills, Mister President.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Oh! I thought it was three. My apologies, acting Leader; please, proceed.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I do duly present the Second Lemonade Legal Reforms of 1776, on the state of Militias. This bill will first of all, update the Rights and Duties of the nobility, before defining what a Militia is and how they operate. Yes, I am aware of the similarities between this bill and the Private Military Organization Act, and therefore seek to explain the inherent differences between the two. A Militia operates on behalf of the Imperial Government, or a Provincial Government. They have a single purpose, whether it be to quell revolts, maintain the peace, or defend against external forces. They serve in place of the Army in cases where the Army is unavailable or otherwise preoccupied. They are not hired by the state, they are raised by the state. They are not private entities, they are agents of the state. And they are not paid in any measure. “Once their sole purpose is served, they shall immediately be dissolved and those who form part of the militia return to their normal occupations, whether it be bakers or farmers. Or bureaucrats such as ourselves. I believe that is all. Questions may now, ah, proceed.”

 

Karl Amador: “May I ask a question?”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Unmoderated debate is now in effect, and so Mr. Amador may of course speak freely.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “I ask the Honourable Member whether he would rescind the claim that we here are bureaucrats. Thank you.”

 

Karl Amador: “Why did you see the need to remove the nobility's old right of having a military force of their own?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Of course, d'Aryn. And Amador, because we are not in a time where every family has their own levy. Our armies are centralized and organized forces, rather than the levy bannermen of all, which are scattered across Duchies, Counties, and such. While the right is there in theory, it is not use in practice.”

 

Karl Amador: “Quite sure there's some Haensetian families that have levies.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “None.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “What about the Ludovars, for example, Mr. Christiensen? They have a large levy of their own and they are on the path of becoming nobility.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “The Ludovar levy is not part of the HRA.nThey have said that many times.”

 

Karl Amador: “And you mean to say with that?”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “If the Ludovars are not nobility, then they do not have the right to a Levy, and thusly go under the Private Military Organization Act, as of current. That is, unless their Levy exists as a Company of the HRA.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Which it does not.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “That is true, da…though I do believe that the late King Sigismund had given them permission. Nevertheless, that does not change the law.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I do believe that it should be considered a Private Military Organization in terms of law, and not a Levy, as the Ludovars are not nobility. But this debate, frankly, is not very relevant to my bill.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “But what happens to their legacy if they are granted peerage?”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “They would have to become a company under the HRA.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Precisely. Though they have been given express permission by His Majesty.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “If they are granted peerage, they can still operate a Private Military

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “His Majesty is dead.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “As long as it is in order with the law, of course.”

 

Karl Amador: “Doesn't mean his permission no longer counts..”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Unless there is a written authorization, then the law cannot view it as an authorized private military organization.nAt least, that is what I took the law to mean.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Either way, the state of the Ludovars will not change because of this bill. This bill changes noble levies and militias, the Ludovars are neither! Goodness me, I motion to vote.”

 

Karl Amador: “Second.”

 

George Galbraith: “Second.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The question is heard and seconded. The roll shall now be called.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I abstain.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador:Abstain.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Ms. Bykov.”

 

Angelika Bykov:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy:Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. O'Rourke.”

 

Padraig O'Rourke:Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin:Majority is not achieved and the matter shall be concluded by way of absentee voting.”

 

George Galbraith: “Seeing as Mr. O'Rourke has returned, may I ask the President to allow him to vote on the Funding Bill that he missed before conclusion? To make it easier.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Chair has no objection to such. Provided Mr. O'Rourke has adequately reviewed the bill.”

 

Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. O'Rourke has voted aye, achieving majority and passing the Funding Bill.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I am conscious we have had a long session, but I seek to broach two matters briefly before concluding. The first is this resolution, written in tandem with the House of Lords regarding the war. Please, take a look. This House is asked to grant its assent and support to the bill as a show of solidarity.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Hear hear.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “If there are no questions from the House, the roll shall be called as this resolution adopted as a show of unity and support.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “I shall vote aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Sir Christiansen.”

 

Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Amador.”

 

Karl Amador: “Still reading, repeat me later please.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Very well. Mr. Galbraith.”

 

George Galbraith: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Ms. Bykov.”

 

Angelika Bykov: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. Rakoczy.”

 

Lukas Rakoczy: “Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Mr. O'Rourke.”

 

Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “And back to Mr. Amador?”

 

Karl Amador: “Da.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Excellent. The Resolution is passed.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Prior to adjournment, I wished to broach the House on the matters of Committees. In past Diets, Committees were composed of three to five Members of the House from both parties to do work and research between sessions. Usually, most of this work was made up of confirmation hearings. I today ask for the House's opinion on whether Committees should be continued in their previous form, or whether their work should be adopted by the House at large. For example, hearings shall be done during sittings such as these, or special, separate sittings. Or if Members have other suggestions for the Committees, they are invited to comment now.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “Mr. President.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “The Chair recognizes Fr. D'Aryn.”

 

Amadeus d'Aryn: “A Committee of the Whole House in which we organise ourselves seems to be the most adequate solution to the most ardent of problems. The inactivity of the committees means that we should condense and consolidate for the time being, until the population has picked up a larger interest in their workings. I support the suggestion.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Thank you, Fr. D'Aryn. Are there any other remarks?”

 

Angelika Bykov: “In fact, I agree with Mr d'Aryn.”

 

George Galbraith: “I think a valid point is raised by the President and Fr. D'Aryn, I concur.”

 

Sir Konstantin: “Are there any other remarks regarding the Committees? Very good. This session is forthwith adjourned. Godspeed, friends.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

VOTE ON THE

SUTICAN RELOCATION COUNT

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1tdsHB9MFdVfHGOs5YCYbez8wfrH9lpxb68pXP9HmGAI/edit?usp=sharing

 

AYE

Galbraith

Bykov

Rakoczy

 

NAY

Christiansen

Amador

D’Aryn

 

ABSTAIN

Wick

 

ABSENT

Stahl-Elendil

Barclay

Gray

O’Rourke

Napier

 

Majority is not achieved. Absentee voting shall be open for 24 Saint’s Hours from now.

 

@Braehn Elendil An'Hiraeth

@argonian

@Thatpyrodude

@Mandalore1

@Hanrahan

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
VOTE ON THE
SECOND LEMONADE LEGAL REFORMS

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1z9Py026k-uiasoQZZmMHylPx-N5tX2IlAYgwl0HSkfw/edit?usp=sharing

 

AYE

Christiansen

Galbraith

Bykov

Rakoczy

D’Aryn

O’Rourke

 

ABSTAIN

Wick

Amador

 

ABSENT

Stahl-Elendil

Barclay

Gray

Napier

 

Majority is not achieved. Absentee voting shall be open for 24 Saint’s Hours from now.

 

@Braehn Elendil An'Hiraeth

@argonian

@Thatpyrodude

@Hanrahan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
VOTE ON THE
IMPERIAL BUSINESS FUNDING BILL

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fJxla3KzHLnzH8wH1pYmQ5ih-cUdHL9olW-0yqkscRM/edit?usp=sharing

 

AYE

Wick

Christiansen

Amador

Galbraith

Bykov

Rakoczy

O’Rourke

 

ABSTAIN

D’Aryn

 

ABSENT

Stahl-Elendil

Barclay

Gray

Napier

 

Majority is achieved and the bill is passed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
VOTE ON THE
ADOPTION BILL
 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1EpOlxCDnrxsdRLai46aUvwS1mrcJUkApJNK3XklvTzU/edit?usp=sharing

 

AYE

Wick

Christiansen

Amador

Galbraith

Bykov

Rakoczy

D’Aryn

O’Rourke

 

ABSENT

Stahl-Elendil

Barclay

Gray

Napier

 

Majority is achieved and the bill is passed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MP Edward Napier votes...

 

NAY on the Sutican Relocation bill.

AYE on the Second Lemonade Legal Reforms bill.

AYE on the Imperial Funding Business bill.

AYE on the Adoption bill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...