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The Fidei Defensor, a thesis

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THE FIDEI DEFENSOR 

A thesis by Laurence August Pruvia, D.B.S. 
15th of Owyn's Flame, 1763

 

The matter of Church and State is an inherently complex one: where theologians and men of statecraft carefully tread alongside the lines separating the analytic from the seditionist, the division of authority and the questioning of it. This leaves the concept of our Fidei Defensor relatively obscure to the minds of the commonfolk, despite it being the most crucial of concepts for the integrity of the faith and the state. 

 

While the Canonist Faith holds a monopoly on theological truth, its function goes far beyond the spreading and institutionalizing of it. The fact that mankind is destined to be bound by one faith: establishes a certain universality to whatever values and notions it upholds. While theoretically sensical, for this to exist, it must adhere to certain pragmatic realities. The most important one being: that a monopoly in whatever form, must be defensible if it is to stay a monopoly.

 

This is done by the Fidei Defensor, which anno 1763 is His Imperial Majesty. While he wields no authority to prescribe an interpretation of the Holy Scrolls or ecclesiastical laws, he is entrusted to protect and enforce them. If Hanseti-Ruska was to hypothetically embrace the Lendian heresy further than it does not: the Church would not have to fight them alone. For we can rely on His Imperial Majesty, his institutions and thus his military to decimate any threat to the monopoly that binds mankind. 

 

This backs our word and our scripture, like gold is backing our currency. It leaves His Imperial Majesty with a profound responsibility of mediating, if not destroying, any divisions within the faith. It is why those from Hanseti-Ruska call upon the ‘Fidei Defensor’ to restore order in the Church, while His Holiness the High Pontiff calls upon the same to cease Haeseni heresy. Critics of the state argue that this makes the Church weak, because an entity stronger than us can rule against our interests. It would make us dependent, or worse, an Imperial puppet.

 

But those critics fail to understand an inherent logic to this unicum: that we get a seat at the table due to His Imperial Majesty in the first place. For without the nearly consistent harmony between the Fidei Defensor and the faith: our authority as God’s institution would’ve been questioned, if not diminished, throughout the realm. We can only uphold the ultimate truth, because the consensus on the truth is enforced in this fashion.

 

Would the fair people of Hanseti-Ruska even entertain His Grace Bishop Anton’s declaration against the Lendian heresy, if it weren’t for the threat of Imperial intervention? Would mankind even unite without a singular faith? It is no surprise that the rebel human realms of the fifth Norlandic war were all heretical: for a supporter of the scripture cannot be rebellious to the authority the scripture establishes. To be rebellious, means you reject the notion that the Emperor defends your faith.

 

“But what if the Emperor is a tyrant?” another critic would ask. This too, is very obvious. In the rare case that His Imperial Majesty would act against scripture or the will of God: the High Pontiff wields the sole authority to strip the title of Fidei defensor from him. In such a scenario, the Empire failed to uphold the Church to begin with. We chose to be codependent due to the mutual benefits that come with it. For both God and the State wish to see an unified humanity, under one God and one nation. 

 

God arranged this relationship so that the forces of morality and the architects of the state, in order for each other’s success, need to cooperate and unite. But in modern times, where secularization and liberalism are becoming increasingly popular: the balance is altered. The state had civilized its enforcement of law, including ecclesiastical law, from the days of pikes and beheadings. There is now due process: and that process complicates a lot of traditions such as Holy Orders, papal tribunals and witch burning.

 

But is that necessarily bad? I would argue that it isn’t. For the Fidei Defensor hasn’t diluted his responsibilities despite these developments. It is why you find blasphemy and heresy to now be forbidden in Imperial law, and Chaplains in the Imperial State Army. Civilization inevitably leads to an expanding state. But instead of opposing these developments as a Church, as a clergyman or Canonist generally: we must understand that our monopoly on morality is not endangered. Better yet, it is now woven into the fabric of Imperial law and society. 

 

From Vice-Chancellor Hugo Wright being a cardinal, to the Reverend Károly being a Senator: we find more individual examples of this church and state harmony day by day. Never has the Church been stronger than it is now, and never are the fears of a Godless state more unjustified. The ambitions of many preceding High Pontiffs are now materialized before our very eyes. Those that refuse to rejoice, but chose to reject instead: are not just heretical, but on the wrong side of history as well. 


 

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The good men of Reza shake their heads at this, ”Bishop Krisztian has finally lost his mind, he makes calling for war with ghosts and bird droppings. Is sad in truth, for this old man’s family’s sake.”

 

edit: lmao I didn’t see you pk’ed Krisztian, but this so funny you copy pasted him I’m leaving it up

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Posted (edited)

The good men of Kaedrin shake their fists at this “The dear Bishop’s murder will be avenged, upon the brow of the flaming rose. We will make ghosts of the murderous pair who took his life and take to task any who sought to aid them.”

Edited by duscur

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Greta would simply cackle in the general direction of the good men of Kaedrin “Ye can try.”

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“I thought Krisztian was dead?” asked Boniface as he heard of the new cardinal, who appeared and was promoted in but a few hours, who appears almost identical to the ‘dead’ cardinal and uses his formatting.

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