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Gusano

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About Gusano

  • Rank
    We are not Imperials, but we are not like the Suticans either.
  • Birthday 11/26/2000

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  • Minecraft Username
    gusanoarentonio

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Denmark
  • Interests
    My wife.

Character Profile

  • Character Name
    L. H. Christiansen
  • Character Race
    President of Oren

Recent Profile Visitors

37,359 profile views
  1. My, my!  You’ve got such a beautiful icon!  I wonder who you commissioned in order to get such lovely artwork! 

    1. Gusano

      Gusano

      pm me i have another business opportunity for you

    2. Fury_Fire

      Fury_Fire

      I made it all by myself

    3. UnBaed
  2. IMPERIAL SENATE 10th of Sigismund’s End, 1761 Provincial Census Information Act AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Elwitt Drumm Karoly
  3. IMPERIAL SENATE 10th of Sigismund’s End, 1761 The Scholastic Subsidization Act AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Elwitt Drumm Karoly
  4. IMPERIAL SENATE 10th of Sigismund’s End, 1761 Confirmation of James Harjalainen as Western Circuit Judge AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Elwitt Drumm PRESENT Karoly
  5. IMPERIAL SENATE 10th of Sigismund’s End, 1761 Members Present Senator Lauritz Christiansen of Helena Senator Conrad Barclay of Helena Senator Terrence May of Haense Senator Konrad Stafyr of Haense Senator Vivaca Rutledge of Curon Senator Gwynnestri Elwitt of Curon Senator Urrigon Drumm of Kaedrin Senator Lajos Karoly of Kaedrin Hearing of James Harjalainen as Western Circuit Judge Lauritz Christiansen: “Sir Harjalainen, please present yourself for the Senate.” James Harjalainen: “It is I, ready and present.” L. Christiansen: “Glad to hear it. Now, if I am not mistaken, you have been nominated to the Western Circuit as a Judge?” J. Harjalainen: “Just so.” L. Christiansen: “Ah, please, tell us of any of your relevant experience.” J. Harjalainen: “The imperial law-book was written by myself during the first five years of tenure in the imperial cabinet, remaining in use until- ah, two years ago! That is nearly twenty years of service. What a good run. Now less green in horn and, uh, longer in tooth, I write legal opinion. Recently drafted property deeds for the Duke Helena himself. I spent... Fifteen? Or twelve, I forget, years as solicitor-general before returning home to visit family. My mother was deathly ill. But by Joren's beard am I wanting to contribute more to law than dissecting judgements. If I may aid the judicial committee in that regard in the future. It would take a fool to call me ignorant of the law. That is all.” Terrence May: “Mister President.” L. Christiansen: “Thank you, Sir Harjalainen. Senator May.” T. May: “I have known Sir Harjalainen since he was but a young office-seeker in the 1720s back when this city was a vestige of the last Imperial Regime. Indeed, his prowess as a junior minister under Emperor Alexander II's government and in the years since shows a promising mind for the law and for the development of our civics. My question for Sir Harjalainen is his position on Civil Unions, which recently passed and received assent by the Crown. Does he intend to ensure that non-Canonist, non-human people obtain their marriage rite as confirmed in the courts?” J. Harjalainen: “My personal intentions aren't of relevance. A judge must, and I admit many do not, rule entirely on the basis of law. If something is legislated, then it is ensured in law. The moralising is the job of the legislator, not the judge. To mix the two only creates problems.” T. May: “I thank the nominee.” Urrigon Drumm raises a hand. L. Christiansen: “Senator Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Sir Veikko, what is your opinion on the case Crown versus Karoly?” J. Harjalainen: “I have many problems with the jurisprudence of the supreme court that need redress through the judicial committee.” Lajos Karoly shakes his head. J. Harjalainen: “In fact, did you know the supreme court gave legal immunity to city-clerks in its 'judicial review concerning city rights'? Wherein it stated that, and I am quoting this verbatim, The City Clerk is beholden to laws passed by the Board of Ward Liverymen, and not the Senate. Do you see why this may be something of a sticky wicket for legislative power?” U. Drumm: “I thank the nominee for his response.” L. Christiansen: “Are there any further inquiries for Sir Harjalainen?” T. May: “Nay.” L. Christiansen: “Then, if there are no objections, I propose we move to the vote.” Conrad Barclay: “I second the motion.” L. Christiansen: “Then I shall call the roll!” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Elwitt.” G. Elwitt: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Elwitt-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Karoly.” L. Karoly: “Present.” L. Christiansen: “Karoly-PRESENT.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “With seven AYEs and one abstention, the nomination is confirmed. Sir Harjalainen is now a judge.” J. Harjalainen: “If I may leave you to your duties.” T. May: “Thank you, Sir Veikko.” L. Christiansen: “You are dismissed, Sir Judge Harjalainen.” The Scholastic Subsidization Act L. Christiansen: “Next on the agenda is the Scholastic Subsidization Act!” Konrad Stafyr rises. K. Stafyr: “My colleagues, I speak before the Senate today to propose a bill which is quite simple in nature. It would establish a fund that consists of three grants of twenty marks each, or sixty marks in total, to be allocated to the Imperial Office of Civil Affairs every five years. The grant proposed in the bill is meant to fund and subsidize the scholastic and academic institutions of the Empire. These would include libraries, academies, museums, and other institutions of academic value. Grants not assigned would be returned to the Imperial Treasury. I believe that this bill is necessary to help foster places of learning. For instance, the Imperial Library is empty, devoid of even a single book! Shall we not encourage scholars to prosper and grow? Shall we not give them a helping hand, to better the futures of our children and ensure that we do not slip back into an age of darkness and despair? That is the purpose and intent of this bill, to help give the office of Civil Affairs the tools that it needs to foster these institutions across the Empire. Thank you.” L. Christiansen: “Are there any inquiries?” T. May: “Mister President.” L. Christiansen: “Senator May.” T. May: “I stand in support of this bill. As many colleagues might know, in our constituency of Haense, we have established a school that is educating the next generation of this great country. The Senate's responsibility is to uphold the values of our people, ushering in the necessary means to equip them to tackle the issues of their day. The schools and students are an investment not only in monetary means, but of the moral character of this Imperium.” U. Drumm: “I motion we vote.” T. May: “I second.” L. Christiansen: “I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Elwitt.” G. Elwitt: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Elwitt-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Karoly.” L. Karoly: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Karoly-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “For the students at St Catherine's College in Haense and the entire future of the Empire! Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “For the good of academic institutions across the Empire, and for those in my own home province! Aye!” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “The bill passes unanimously.” Provincial Census Information Act T. May: “Mister President, I send to the desk the census act we passed last session with the revisions that conform to the Crown's message of conditional assent. I ask for unanimous consent that we vote on the bill and dispense all debate. The revisions are as follows: The removal of the Senators to ask for their census records and to amend the authority of the Civil Affairs Committee chair to request, no authorize, for the documents. I yield back and motion to vote on the bill, with the amendments.” L. Christiansen: “Any objections?” U. Drumm: “I second.” L. Christiansen: “I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Elwitt.” G. Elwitt: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Elwitt-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Karoly.” L. Karoly: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Karoly-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye!” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “The bill passes unanimously.” Amendment to the Judiciary Act of 1740 T. May: “Mister President, I rise to propose an amendment to the Judiciary Act of 1740, allowing for judges from the provinces which they come from to be given precedence to try cases in their provinces before seeking judges from out of the province.It will retain the circuit system which we current have.” L. Christiansen: “Do you have it in written form?” T. May: “It is in written form.” L. Christiansen: “Please direct it to the desk.” Copies of the bill are handed out. L. Christiansen: “Thank you. Are there any inquiries?” T. May: “If there is no objection, I ask for the ayes and nays.” K. Stafyr: “I second the Senator's motion to move to a vote.” L. Christiansen: “I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE. Sorry I meant… Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Elwitt.” G. Elwitt: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Elwitt-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Karoly.” L. Karoly: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Karoly-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye!” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “The amendment passes unanimously.” Speech from Terrence May T. May: “Mister President.” L. Christiansen: “Senator May.” T. May: “I would like to make a statement before we are adjourned.” L. Christiansen: “Go on, Senator May.” T. May: “Many of our colleagues are being challenged for their seat in this upcoming election. It is an unprecedented election year as we are all being challenged in our way, for the work we do in this chamber. Whether we have done enough or if we have failed to serve our constituents in a way that is fitting to them, I remind this chamber that service in this place is of the highest order. If we do not campaign, show our support, involve ourselves in the provinces whence we came, we cannot truly call ourselves Senators. Mister President, I believe we must be passionate in our debate, but also not to lose sight of the interests of those we are elected to represent. I pray that the candidate who triumphs is the one who maintains their promises. I yield the floor.” L. Christiansen: “Thank you, Senator May. The meeting is now dismissed.”
  6. Lauritz C. prepares his (and only) outfit for the wedding.
  7. SURNAME: Christiansen FIRST NAME: Lauritz H. ADDRESS OF RESIDENCE: Basrid Boulevard V DATE OF BIRTH: 13th of Godfrey’s Triumph, 1733 Are you registered and eligible to vote in the province of Helena?: Yes Do you have any other title, peerage or public service that may conflict with becoming an Imperial Senator, as per the Edict of Establishment (1736) or Edict of Election (1736)?: No If yes, do you understand that you will be required to resign or abdicate from this position should you be elected to the Imperial Senate, and if this does not occur your seat shall be considered to be vacant?: N/A ((MC NAME)): seannie22
  8. Lauritz beams upon hearing of the announcement, having waited impatiently for many months for the academy to open!
  9. IMPERIAL SENATE 11th of Tobias' Bounty, 1761 The Rotation Act AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Drumm ABSENT Elwitt Karoly
  10. IMPERIAL SENATE 11th of Tobias' Bounty, 1761 The Goblin Act AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Drumm ABSENT Elwitt Karoly
  11. IMPERIAL SENATE 11th of Tobias' Bounty, 1761 Provincial Census Information Act AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Drumm ABSENT Elwitt Karoly
  12. IMPERIAL SENATE 11th of Tobias' Bounty, 1761 National Land Survey Bill AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Drumm ABSENT Elwitt Karoly
  13. IMPERIAL SENATE 11th of Tobias' Bounty, 1761 The Judicial Reform Act AYE Christiansen Barclay May Stafyr Rutledge Drumm ABSENT Elwitt Karoly
  14. IMPERIAL SENATE 11th of Tobias' Bounty, 1761 Members Present Senator Lauritz Christiansen of Helena Senator Conrad Barclay of Helena Senator Terrence May of Haense Senator Konrad Stafyr of Haense Senator Vivaca Rutledge of Curon Senator Urrigon Drumm of Kaedrin HH Amelya of Reza The Judicial Reform Act Lauritz Christiansen: “We will now commence the meeting! Senator May, I believe you wished to introduce your bill first?” Terrence May: “Together with my colleague here from Helena, Mister Barclay, this deal will bring an end to our dysfunctional courts and render justice to all fairly. While not diminishing the importance of being judged by your peers, it is fluid and flexible in the distribution of judges throughout the Holy Orenian Empire. I am proud to introduce the Judicial Reform Act of 1761.” L. Christiansen: “Thank you, Senator May.” Amelya of Reza passes around copies of the bill. Urrigon Drumm: “Thank you.” L. Christiansen: “Are there any inquiries in regard to this bill?” Konrad Stafyr: “No inquiries, but I too would like to voice my support for this revised piece of legislation.” T. May: “Hear, hear.” L. Christiansen: “You may rise, Senator Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “This bill, if passed into law, would be a splendid way to deal with the topic of judicial reform in the Empire. It's been carefully crafted to satisfy the concerns of all regarding this issue. There isn't much more to say other than that. I yield the remainder of my time to the chair.” L. Christiansen: “Well, I motion that we proceed to the vote.” T. May: “I second.” V. Rutledge: “Yeah, lets just vote.” L. Christiansen: “Lovely. I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “On behalf of efficient and effective courts - Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye, this bill is desperately needed to streamline the courts and our legal system.” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “With six AYEs and two absentees, the bill passes.” T. May: “Hear, hear!” National Land Survey Bill L. Christiansen: “Next, we shall do the Survey Bill!” T. May: “Mister President.” L. Christiansen: “Senator May.” T. May: “The Interior Committee had a very productive discussion on this Survey Bill, an act to provide the means to map this Empire and provide deeds to private ownership of lands not within provincial territories. I yield.” L. Christiansen: “Any inquiries, or anyone who wishes to speak their support?” U. Drumm: “I would like to.” L. Christiansen: “Senator Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Sir May, Stafyr and I put in a good deal of work with Secretary Clement on this. I think the members of this chamber would agree it's the right way in moving forward. I yield.” L. Christiansen: “Thank you, Senator Drumm.” K. Stafyr: “I move that we take a vote on this bill, there is little else to discuss.” T. May: “Mister President, I do think that part of the bill should be allowed to explain further that deeds are applicable to private ownership of land not land of entitlement, provinces, and public grants by the Crown.” L. Christiansen: “You wish to amend the bill? Or, what do you mean?” T. May: “So if we can add that amendment, that would be nice.” L. Christiansen: “I second this amendment.” T. May: “I ask for unanimous consent that this amendment be adopted.” L. Christiansen: “Are there any objections to the amendment?” T. May: “If there is no objection, let the bill move to a vote as amended.” L. Christiansen: “Aye, aye. I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “With six AYEs and two absentees, the bill passes.” Provincial Census Information Act L. Christiansen: “Next is the Census Act.” T. May: “Mister President.” L. Christiansen: “Senator May.” T. May: “Together with my colleague Senator Rutledge, we have collaborated on this very important bill! The provincial governments ought to have a right to gain access to their census records, right? Together with Miss Rutledge, Chair of the Civil Affairs Committee, I am hereby proposing that provinces can gain access to who fills in the census in their region. We can gain access to the census by right of the provincial government, by the senate delegation request, and or by the chair of the civil affairs committee.” V. Rutledge: “Hear, hear.” T. May: “The Secretary of the Civil Affairs MUST comply. I yield.” L. Christiansen: “Any inquiries or statements to be made regarding the bill?” U. Drumm: “I motion we vote.” K. Stafyr: “I second.” L. Christiansen: “I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “With six AYEs and two absentees, the bill passes.” The Goblin Act L. Christiansen: “Next, I rise to propose the Goblin Act. It is a very simple act, that in the light of recent events, amends the status of Goblins. ” T. May: “Hear, hear.” L. Christiansen: “Are there any inquiries to be made?” C. Barclay: “I motion we proceed straight to a vote.” U. Drumm: “I second.” L. Christiansen: “I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “With six AYEs and two absentees, the bill passes.” The Rotation Act L. Christiansen: “Next, I rise to propose the Rotation Act.” V. Rutledge: “Hear, hear.” L. Christiansen: “It is an act to show that the Senate is not a Helenan Institution, but one of all of the Empire. As such, it decrees that the Senate shall rotate between the different Provinces.” T. May: “Rotates?” V. Rutledge: “Mister President, if I may speak.” L. Christiansen: “Yes, May, rotates. From Helena, to Haense, and so on and so forth. The seat would rotate. Now, Senator Rutledge may speak.” V. Rutledge: “Mister President, I will speak from the benches.” L. Christiansen: “Of course.” V. Rutledge: “For years now I've advocated the idea of a rotating Senate. That is why I cosponsored this bill. We can become an Imperial Senate that connects with all the people of the Empire, from the Marine in Curon to the merchant in Helena. We must become a more flexible legislative body so people in every province can connect with the Imperial Legislature. I yield.” L. Christiansen: “Thank you, Senator Rutledge. I motion that we move to the vote.” C. Barclay: “I second.” L. Christiansen: “I will now call the roll.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Barclay.” C. Barclay: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Barclay-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Christiansen-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Mister Drumm.” U. Drumm: “Aye.” L. Christiansen: “Drumm-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “Sir May.” T. May: “Present.” L. Christiansen: “May-PRESENT.” L. Christiansen: “Miss Rutledge.” V. Rutledge: “Aye, for a flexible Senate.” L. Christiansen: “Rutledge-AYE.” T. May: “I seek to change my vote! Aye!” L. Christiansen: “May-AYE.” T. May: “I will be using the TRAIN!” L. Christiansen: “Sir Stafyr.” K. Stafyr: “Aye! The rail system is marvelous thanks to our good friend Senator Drumm!” L. Christiansen: “Stafyr-AYE.” L. Christiansen: “With six AYEs and two absentees, the bill passes.” L. Christiansen: “This meeting is dismissed.”
  15. Lauritz wandered into the empty Varoche Hall, leaving the d’Arkents to say their goodbyes to Charlotte. They had gotten off on the wrong foot, he knew that much. Yet he had tried to redemy it to the best of the ability, and came to consider her a friend. Yet, such an idealistic scenario would soon come to shatter and he could only wonder if he could have done anything differently. He leaned his head upwards to the chandelier: “You never did tell me about that fight.”
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