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    President of Oren

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  1. “Cope,” says former President of Oren Lukas Rakoczy, standing beside official portraits of former President Terrence May, former President Lauritz Christiansen, former President Konrad Stafyr, and former President Konstantin Wick.
  2. A letter bearing the seal of the Leader of the Opposition, Lukas Rakoczy arrives at Varoche Hall. “To my fellow Members of the House of Commons, A cabinet secretary as the leader of this body does not sit well with me. An unchecked cabinet member is how Edward Galbraith was able to effectively control the city government of Helena. The President must be an elected representative that is not affiliated with any other branch of government. As the Leader of the Opposition, it is my honor to nominate Edwin Winter for the position of President of Commons. Signed, Lukas Rakoczy MHC”
  3. Lukas Rakoczy (vote Rakoczy 1786) prepares to empty his bank account. “That portrait will be mine..”
  4. The former President of Oren (vote Rakoczy 1786) woke up to a paper taped to his face and the sound of nails being hammered into his front door. He smiled, knowing what this meant. “Finally.”
  5. The former President of Oren (vote Rakoczy 1786) smiled at the announcement. “She was always kind. I have high hopes for her!”
  6. To the Supreme Court, This letter is penned by several former Members of the Commons of the 18th Imperial Diet, hereafter “the Respondents”, in response to the Request for Judicial Review published by Mr. Conrad Barclay, hereafter “the Appellant”, and shall herein demonstrate to the Supreme Court that the Second Lemonade Legal Reforms, hereafter “the Reforms”, present no constitutional issues. The Respondents respectfully reject the Appellant’s submission that the Reforms are in conflict with ORC604.02, providing that “the Imperial Diet’s functions and legislation, as a whole, are prohibited from interaction with the following matters of state, which remain the exclusive purview of the Crown as the executive”. This response will endeavour to justify this rejection by demonstrating to the Court that (1) militias cannot be construed to hold the same meaning as the military and obligations of peerage do not qualify as a matter of state, and (2) that the Court can construct the wording of ORC604’s restrictions to mean the Imperial State Military and not the militias of peers. Matters of State The Respondents begin by submitting to the Court that the exact wording of ORC604.02 provides that the Imperial Diet cannot interact with the military or the appointment of officers, the Crown, diplomacy or the creation or dissolvement of political parties. ORC604.02 clearly defines these four jurisdictions as “matters of state”. The Respondent thus submit that the obligations of peers and the management of their estates do not fall within the classification as an exclusive matter of state, and thus “militia” as prescribed by the Reforms cannot be construed to hold the same meaning as “the military” as referenced in ORC604.02. Constructed Meaning The Respondents further submit that in consideration of the General Provisions and Definitions of the Oren Revised Code, “the military” should be construed to mean “the Imperial State Military” under the exclusive purview of the Council and Head of State and not informal militias raised by peers. Signed, Former President Rakoczy on behalf of Members of the Commons
  7. VOTE ON THE JUDICIARY SALARY AMENDMENT ACT AYE Rakoczy C. Barclay O. Barclay Wick Baruch Kortrevich Christiansen NAY Stahl-Elendil O’Rourke Bykov ABSTAIN Galbraith ABSENT Carrion Majority is achieved and the bill is passed.
  8. SITTING OF THE 18TH IMPERIAL DIET SUN’S SMILE, 1784 Present: Lukas Rakoczy; Jonah Stahl-Elendil; Conrad Barclay; George Galbraith; Padraig O’Rourke; Konstantin Wick; Sigmar Baruch; Juliyus Kortrevich; Angelika Bykov; Lauritz Christiansen. Absent: Osvald Barclay; Ostromir Carrion. Lukas Rakoczy: “This sitting of the 18th Imperial Diet is now in session.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Before we begin, Mr Leader.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I must report that the motion to remove article two from the Judiciary Salary Act failed to achieve majority during absentee voting.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Then we'd better figure something out today if we want to actually make a change.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Ooh, judiciary salary.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Leader, you may declare the agenda for this sitting.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Lauritz, I would've liked your opinions on this one last time. Thank you for coming, maybe we can actually make something work.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Honorable Members of the Diet.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “My absence was warranted by a bout of sickness.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Well I am happy you are feeling better. Now, we have two Judicial confirmations today, as well as the discussion of a potential third. Furthermore, we shall continue the discussion of the Judicial Salary bill.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Shall we do the confirmations or the bill first?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Let's do the bill, first.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The biggest issue that has arisen is one of fairness.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Do we allow the Supreme Court members to pursue free enterprise outside of their bench, if we make their pay a case by case basis?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Or, do we continue to pay them a yearly salary.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Wick has decided to abstain indefinitely on this matter...even though he wrote the thing.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “So, it is up to us.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “We'll move to unmoderated debate on this then.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I do not believe it is fair to limit a mans ability to earn an income, when his income is dependent on whether or not there is a constitutional question in the Courts.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Hear, hear!” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We must either pay them a yearly salary, or let them pursue businesses. I for one, support a yearly salary.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “And I am of the opinion that it is not fair to the Empire as a whole to allow these justices to furthur their bias.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I think all justices should be paid on a yearly business while being allowed to pursue their own businesses. It is only fair, really.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Provide free housing and board for them,” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Remove the yearly salary.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That's not how this works, Konstnatin.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Nor should they get fat off the the people's money for doin' nothin'.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “We pay people pensions, don't we?2.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Niet somethin' I voted for nor would Ah 'ave, unless its for veterans.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Mister Konstantin's suggestion is quite agreeable.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “What about it doesn't work? Their essential expenses are mitigated and they are paid for work done.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “No one should have free housing.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Apart from the homeless.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “It is not free.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “It is payment for their services.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Shall I limit your decisions in life because of your position, Konstantin?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Economic freedom means being able to use the money you earned for what you wish.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Sides, the people on the bench 'ave already made qui'e a pretty mina 'fore takin' it up, if they do nie' 'ave enough to live off of after takin' the bench, it's cause they spend too frivolously.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “There are judicial reviews and appeals being made constantly; they'd earn a fine wage off dealing with those cases if they just hurried up about it.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I don't understand what is limiting about it. It's a line of work voluntarily undertaken that attracts little business.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I still firmly believe that all justices, whether supreme court or not, should have a yearly salary, and be allowed to have businesses.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “It is the bulwark of our Imperial Legal system. It ends there, and should be rewarded.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Allowing them to have business is insane.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “They remain paid for the work they undertake and have their essential expenses mitigated.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “They can't recuse themselves.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Seems like an apt compromise to me.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Housing is not payment.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Good point, Barclay.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “It's not sole payment, and it is a form of payment, yes.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Housing normally constitutes a considerable expense for the common man.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Mister Barclay is wholely in the right, we cannot allow these justices to run a buisness.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Yearly salary, yearly salary for all justices, for all justices!” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Or hold any major role in one.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Many jobs are paid by wages rather than salaries; why are the Supreme Court Justices above a wage?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Because their wage is dependent on the courts sending cases to them.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Which happens regularly.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “It is inconsistent and unfair.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “It is not regular enough.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “A builder's wage is dependent on there being houses to build. It doesn't always happen, but it happens often enough.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “So are the wages of the commoner.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “The Supreme Court lets cases sit for years - that's their own problem.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “This would encourage them to speed things up.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Ah'll tell ye wha's unfair, them sittin' on their arses twittlin' their thumbs while their pockets grow wit' mina tha' they've done nothin' to deserve.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The Highest Court in the Empire is not 'nothing', Mister Baruch.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “It is when they do nie' 'ave cases, Mister Elendil.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Is how much justices are paid really that big of an issue?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Supreme Court or not.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I will entertain a proposition of adding free housing and board to the bill, if anyone wishes to pursue,” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Baruch.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I'd stick to everyone having a yearly salary, seems fair to me.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “You are unfamiliar with how the system works.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “But Sir Wick, how would this be enforce?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “How do you mean?” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “As I stated before, I believe this addition to the bill is quite agreeable. It closes any gaps that inadequite cases may cause.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Ah'm familiar qui'e familiar, Mister Konstantin's offer is fair, if they wan' a form o' payment for nie' 'aving cases, there it is.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I will not accept it. A salary, or opened business ventures.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Is it your place to accept this?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Hm... What quality would this free housing have, Sir Wick?” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Hmph...if it is between that, than a salary, Mr. Elendil.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “So either conflicts o' interest, or lack o' work is rewarded?” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Wages are fine; leave the bill as it is.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I'm not much of an architect, Let's go with 'nice'.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “What is worse, losing a fraction of Imperial funds per week, or having biased justices.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “The justices aren't starving; they can be paid by the work they do.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Ahem. If I may, actually.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That money can go very quick when there are no cases to be heard, Mister Barclay.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “After you.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “And da, that was my main concern, Sir Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Wait, you all pay taxes?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “If we take a look at Treasury requisition records going back, you can see they're not...well, actively claimed.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “We might be inclined to deduce that money does not seem to be a particular priority. What started this bill was a Justice trying to claim several years worth of salary at once.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “More recently, someone tried to claim 40 years of salary!” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “What the ****?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Pardon me.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “He was a Circuit, of course, but it's...an interesting example.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Wait, Circuit isn't paid though.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Point being, I don't think our Justices are towing the poverty line.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I am personally unconvinced that they need frequent and generous salaries in view of these Treasury Requisitions.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “But the principle of this bill, says that we can limit a mans ability to earn an income in far too many ways.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They are forced to ignore private enterprise, or give up their position as the highest law officers of the country.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The top legal minds and experts, who we trust to be impartial, are severely limited in so many ways because of this bill.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “If you believe the salaries are generous, then I would be open to revising them, but I believe the frequent salaries are necessary.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Which they voluntarily undertake and are awarded for the work done. I see no reason to pay them for years in which they do no work; we have a responsibility to be prudent with the money of this Empire.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Misses Bykov, do you truely believe that paying men for no work is necessity?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That's not the question here, Mister Kortrevich.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “How about a tax exemption, then with with a salary per case?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “So, I advocate that we afford them free housing and board and pay them by work.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Are you amending your bill, Sir Wick?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That is not how the economy works, Mister Wick.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “They are hardly rewarded, Sir Wick. And it is not their fault that cases are rare, Mr. Kortrevich.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Builders, plumbers, masons, miners, farmers, and many more are only paid a wage.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Justices rarely even claim their salaries.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “They can accept a wage too.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “But it is indeed their fault for being plump 'n lazy!” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Da, but labor jobs are much more frequent.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Laborers in /most/ parts of the country, where feudalism is not the law of the land.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “There's a new case for the court every year or two.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Can go pursue their work.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I think the amendment to be appropriate and fairer, Mr. President.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The Justices cannot seek more work.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, as the author of the bill, you are permitted to amend it.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “They can.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Please make the appropriate changes on the bill itself.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “How, Mister Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “They can work for the Crown.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Either there are many cases and their wage is sufficient, or there are few cases and they can take on side-work in the bureaucracy.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That again.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Opens them up to bias.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “You want a case regarding Ministry of Interior or Foreign Affairs to go to the supreme court?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And find out that the Chief Justice works for the Interior as well?” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Well, legally speaking, they can already do that. So you'd want to pass a bill there if that's a concern.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If you want an impartial court, you need to pay for that.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “So is it only Supreme Court Justices that get tax exemptions, or all justices? According to this amendment, that is.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Pay the judges their salary, don't let them collect back pay of more than two years.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Circuit Justices are paid less than Supreme Court Justices, surely they should be allowed a tax exemption, as well?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Circuit Justices aren't paid at all.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Circuit Justices can take on other work and have business interests as they please.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Which is the only good thing about this bill, paying them.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Wick, how about a tax exemption for all justices!” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Niet, that simply won't work.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We need tax revenue too, Mister Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I think that unnecessary. Supreme Court Justices will now no longer need to pay tax and Circuit Justices can pursue business.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “I doubt the provinical governments will agree to such.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Give men their money.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “The Lemonade Business isn't as profitable as it used to be.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Don't let them collect more than two years back pay.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Mister Stahl-Elendil, this still does not fix the issue of payment for no work.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I do like the sound of rewarding proactive and diligent justices more than lazy ones.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Frankly, Mister Kortrevich.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “You don't understand how the economy works.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Or what constitutes 'work'.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “I can assure you all that with a different Palatine of Haense, free housing and essentials for Haeseni justices will not be granted.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The view of this issue is so narrow, that you run the risk of creating more problems.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I hard the next Palatine of Haense is currently a seven year old boy.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “*Frankly*, Mister Stahl-Elendil, I do not care what you think I understand.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “How can ye assure such? Do ye speak on behalf of the haeseni government?” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Naturally, Sir Wick will not always serve such a position. We can not legislate just for the present, but for the future as well.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Well, if we put it in law, they have no choice but to do it.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “But they won't. It will not be enforced.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I don't see why it wouldn't be, personall.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If we're going to talk about the enforcement of Imperial laws, we'll be here all day.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Niet, of course I don't speak on behalf of the Haeseni government, Sir Baruch, it is simply common sense.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Yearly salary, prevent collection of back pay after two years.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “And that is a fair point, Mr. Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We can even adjust the pay amount.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “But it is simple. Free housing will simply not work in the long run.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “But this is a bad bill in the philosophical and in the functional.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Will we have a vote today?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “A yearly salary means paying someone for a year of work in which no work is done. It's a failure to fulfill our financial obligations to the Orenian public, I think.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “I doubt it, at this rate.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Misses Bykov, what do you mean that it will not work? The argument was that a justice could not live off a wage, this fixes that issue.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “It is fiscally iresponsible for the government to pay a court tha' is ne'er in session, it is fiscally responsible to pay a court for holdin' sessions.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Such a law is hardly enforcable. A yearly salary is the best option.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Wick, the Supreme Courts workload does not solely exist based on their own efforts but on the efforts of other judges in the circuit that I would like to actually confirm today.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Do you pay Imperial taxes, Sigmar?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Mr. President.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Nie' Ah do niet, but looking out for the people yer levying taxes against is the duty of a member of the house of commons Mister Elendil.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I remain in abstention. The House may call for a vote on its own accord.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I don't want to hear about fiscal responsibility when it isn't your money that's going to these judges.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Seconded.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Hear, hear!” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “You need to make the motion first.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Was a motion introduced?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “You are seconding nothing, Mr Leader.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “So I motion for a vote.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Seconded.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Alright, the motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I shall vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Nay.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Abstain.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr O'Rourke.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Nay.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Well, this has turned into quite the pickle,” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Your vote, Sir.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Bah,” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mrs Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Nay.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I believe I must compromise on my ideals this time. Aye... Out of the principle that circuit justices should be paid. I hope the House will revisit this matter later, however.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Baruch.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “On this matter, the ayes are six, the nays are three, and the abstentions are one. The bill has not achieved majority and shall be decided through absentee voting.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Members will have twenty four Saint's hours following the publication of today's transcript to vote.” VOTE ON THE JUDICIARY SALARY AMENDMENT ACT AYE Rakoczy C. Barclay Wick Baruch Kortrevich Christiansen NAY Stahl-Elendil O’Rourke Bykov ABSTAIN Galbraith ABSENT O. Barclay Carrion Majority is NOT achieved and the matter shall be decided by way of absentee voting. Members shall have twenty-four Saint’s hours to vote. The matter requires ONE vote to achieve a majority. ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Let us proceed. Mr Leader, what is next on the agenda?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Well...onto a happier note.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “The Lords can't deny something,” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Christiansen.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Hm- seems irrational to put Justices on such welfare programs by fiscally limiting their actions.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “If Basileus is here, shouldn't I go last?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Ah, there you are.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Baelius, please, come down.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Let us hear you.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “One moment, gentlemen.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Baelius, please come forward and present yourself to this body.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Baelius. You have been nominated by the Stahl-Elendil ministry to become a Circuit Court Justice.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “You can introduce yourself and give a brief overview of your experience, and then we shall proceed to unmoderated debate where members will have the opportunity to question you.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “You may begin your introduction.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “Honourable Members of the House of Commons. I am honoured to have been nominated by the esteemed Archchancellor for a position so important to the Imperial Justice system. But one does not get such nomination without the proper qualification. I have been a servant of the Imperial Justice system for roughly fifteen years now. I began within the Ministry of Justice.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “I became a Lawclerk under Mr. Farooq Gray at the age of fifteen, I read the entirety of the Oren Revised Code before my seventeeth birthday and rose to Attorney-General within four years of service to the system.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “I understand and know the methods of the legal courts. I have served within them for half of my life. I am currently Assistant Solicitor-General, only further proving by the amount of trust given within the Ministry of Justice, of my abilities within the methods of our legal system. Justice has been my life. I have read the Oren Revised Code multiples times throughout my existance. I have read and attempted to improve upon our methods.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “I am a humble servant of the law, of the Code. I am believer in Justice and thereby bringing it forth to the people of our Empire. I live and breathe for the weapon most mighty to our internal structure - that of law and of order. And as Justice within our Courts, that shall be my contribution to the Imperial Lands.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “If that's it, then we'll proceed to unmoderated debate.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Any recent cases, sir?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Members may question the nominee freely.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “As the sole Solicitor of the Ministry of Justice for a period of three years - I have represented a varity of people. My most recent case would've been that of The Crown v. Alimar. As Assistant Solicitor-General, a lot of my personal service have been provided to improvement of the Ministry of Justice. Closer inspections and suggestions of improvement of the legal system, as Mr. Elendil would be able to confirm.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “My personal service has been provided to improvement of the Ministry of Justice. Closer inspections and suggestions of improvement of the legal system, as Mr. Elendil would be able to confirm.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “That the one with the, ah... Kharjyr?” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “That'd be correct.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I remember that one, As I recall it was a bit of an odd one.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Charges filed under injury against the person relating to a non-person.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “It was a complicated case with multiple individuals involved both on the part of the Ministry, as well as, a change of Justice in the middle of the case. The case did reach a proper conclusion a couple of Saint Days ago.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Oh, truly? What was the verdict?” ‎ George Galbraith: “I believe they arrived at a plea deal. Not sure what the terms were, though.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Mhm. I was just...well, slightly concerned that the Ministry was filing charges under injuries against the person in relation to a non-person. I've no sympathy for Alimar, mind you, but being a Judge....” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “ .. Well, following the law in its written form is a big part of that.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Well, they did recognize the Kha had the Right to Life, a key concern when the Kha was attacked.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “It was still alive, wasn't it?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Is Right to Life encompassed under Injuries Against the Person?” ‎ George Galbraith: “A possible attack can infringe on a Kha's Right to Life.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “If I recall rightly, Rights are in the Addendum.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “The Defendant agreed to a plea agreement between the Crown and the Defendant. We resulted in dropping the charges of the ORC 206 against Mr. Alimar, but Mr. Alimar did plead guilty to the charges of morality. We're all bound to have different views upon the methods of the law. There is a key difference between that of the prosecution and that of the Justice. It was within my belief as the Prosecution-.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “Of the crime commited by Mr. Alimar, that these laws would apply to the individual. I charged Mr. Alimar with the laws breached by the crime itself - thereby doing my service as the Prosecution in properly charging the criminal.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “It's not a question of interpretation, though. The subpoena was filed with charges under injuries against the person, and these Khattajyr, are clearly defined as non-people.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I'm not taking a side, mind you, nor do I think he should not have been prosecuted. I just wanted to hear your perspective on the matter.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Kharajyr,” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “As a Justice, of course, a difference applies. One must look closer to the law on the side of a Justice - I have read the law, I know the law. But - I will do the work required by my office, Ministry or Justice, as it shall be done. If one cannot do the work of which the specific request, my current office requiring utmost attention to bringing all crimes forward to the Justice, then I do not personally one is fit for any form of office.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “As a Justice, closer inspection shall occur of the law - closer knowlegde, more direct approach to that of written note. For that is the office of the Justice; not the office of the Solicitor. If I cannot protect and perform that of which my office is required; as a Solicitor, that would be bringing forth those crimes of which I did, then I fail as a Solicitor. I do not intend to fail as a Solicitor nor as a Justice.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Are there any more questions for the nominee?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I motion to vote.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Seconded.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, the motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I shall vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr O'Rourke.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Baruch.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mrs Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The ayes are nine, the nays are zero. The nominee is confirmed as a Circuit Court Justice.” ‎ VOTE ON THE CONFIRMATION OF BASILEIOS BAELIUS AS A CIRCUIT JUDGE AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith O’Rourke Baruch Kortrevich Bykov Christiansen ABSENT O. Barclay Carrion Majority is achieved and the nominee is confirmed. Lukas Rakoczy: “Congratulations Mr Baelius.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Well done.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Now, we call Mister Christiansen to the floor.” ‎ Basileios Baelius: “I thank the Honourable Member of the House. I shant disappoint.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Christiansen, please step forward.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Hello, hello.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I assume I have to make a kind of introduction, right?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Well, I'll start with the fact that I'm resigning my seat in the House of Commons, effective immediately, if the President will allow me.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Well, does he?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “This is certainly unprecedented, but your resignation is approved. This body thanks you for your countless years of service to the Orenian people.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Good, I assume we can proceed then.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “With that Sir, you have been nominated to serve as a Circuit Court Justice.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “If you wish to give an introduction you may, though I don't believe there's anyone here that does not know you already.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I doubt there is, either. Though, I do press that I was a judge once before, and that I'd wager none know the law better than I, except for mayhaps Konstantin.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “If that's it, then we'll proceed to questioning.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Are there any questions for Sir Christiansen?” ‎ George Galbraith: “I motion to vote, if none.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Is there a second?” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “I second.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, the motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I shall vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr O'Rourke.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Baruch.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mrs Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Chr-” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I would've voted nay, had I the option.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The ayes are seven, the nays zero. The nominee is confirmed.” VOTE ON THE CONFIRMATION OF SIR LAURITZ CHRISTIANSEN AS A CIRCUIT JUDGE AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith O’Rourke Baruch Kortrevich Bykov ABSENT O. Barclay Carrion Majority is achieved and the nominee is confirmed. ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Congratulations, Lauritz.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Thank you for the continued trust, my former colleagues.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “We done? Ah'm fook'n starvin', got a feast to get to.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “May you continue to create prosperity for us all, while I will uphold the law.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Make that eight ayes.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Is there anything else on the agenda for today, Mr Leader?” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Indeed. Thank you for your service, Sir Christiansen.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “No, that is it.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “I wish you the best of luck in the Circuit.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Right, that about does it.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “In that case, this sitting of the 18th Diet is adjourned.”
  9. VOTE ON THE BACKPAYMENT ACT AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith Carrion Baruch Bykov Christiansen ABSTAIN Wick Kortrevich ABSENT O. Barclay O’Rourke Majority is achieved and the bill is passed. VOTE ON THE REMOVAL OF ARTICLE TWO FROM THE JUDICIARY SALARY ACT AYE Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith Carrion Bykov Christiansen NAY Baruch Kortrevich ABSTAIN Rakoczy Wick ABSENT O. Barclay O’Rourke After twenty-four Saint’s hours for absentee voting, majority is still not achieved and the motion fails.
  10. SITTING OF THE 18TH IMPERIAL DIET TOBIAS’ BOUNTY, 1784 Present: Lukas Rakoczy; Jonah Stahl-Elendil; Conrad Barclay; George Galbraith; Konstantin Wick; Ostromir Carrion; Juliyus Kortrevich. Angelika Bykov; Absent: Osvald Barclay; Padraig O’Rourke; Sigmar Baruch; Lauritz Christiansen. Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, this sitting of the 18th Imperial Diet is now in session.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Leader, what is on the agenda for today?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Thank you Mister President.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “First order of agenda.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Er, George, what's the name of your bill again?” ‎ George Galbraith: “The Backpay Procedure Bill, and the Exemption Bill.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Right, I yield the floor to Mister Galbraith for the Backpay Procedure bill.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Right.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Procedure upon backpay in regards to the Treasury has always been implicit, therefore being carefully taken advantage of when it comes to claiming backpay, regardless of whether they've been active at the job constituting such.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Such a bill would effectively reprimand those machinations, legislating backpay, and monetary claims, and the grand scheme of it's procedure.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, we'll proceed to unmoderated debate.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Are there no comments or questions?” ‎ George Galbraith: “If none, I motion to vote, then.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Seconded.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The motion is heard and seconded. I shall now call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I shall vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Abstain.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Didn't you help write the thing.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye..?” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Abstain.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mrs Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “On this matter, the ayes are five, the nays are zero, and the abstentions are two. The bill has not received majority and will instead be decided through absentee voting.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Sir President! I vote Aye!” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Oh, one moment. I've made a mistake.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Thank you, Sir Carrion.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “My apologies.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “George Galbraith seems to have put on a few pounds since last meeting.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “It is understandable.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “An update, there are now six ayes in favor. The matter shall still be concluded through absentee voting.” VOTE ON THE BACKPAYMENT ACT AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith Carrion Bykov ABSTAIN Wick Kortrevich ABSENT O. Barclay O’Rourke Baruch Christiansen Majority is NOT achieved and the matter shall be decided by way of absentee voting. Members shall have twenty-four Saint’s hours to vote. The matter requires ONE vote to achieve a majority. ‎ George Galbraith: “Onto the next one.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “What is next on the agenda?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “George once again.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, go ahead Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “There has been historic and notable confusion to what procedures of exempting institutions from tax as well as recognizing that an institution is qualified for such a priviledge.” ‎ George Galbraith: “This bill would simply seek to codify the eligibility of such.” ‎ George Galbraith: “And procedure.” ‎ George Galbraith: “If examples are needed, the NGS was almost evicted because no one knew that it was a non profitable educative institution, and was already tax exempt in other areas. Through such a process, it would be easier to prevent such confusion, through a codified process.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “If that is all, then we'll move into unmoderated debate.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Will there be no debate again?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I support this bill.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I have some head fog, taking me a minute to read.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “It is thorough and clears up issues that have affected institutions such as the NGS, for a long time.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “No need to debate a good bill.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye, if there is no debate, I motion to vote.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Hmmm, perhaps, those living in provincial regions can submit the registry directly the the Primary Finance Officer?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I'll give a bit more time for questions.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Submitting it to the Interior just seems to be an additional and unnecessary step.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Though, if that were so, the consistency would still not be present.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “But that is just my personal opinion. I support this bill regardless.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Situations with the NGS would continue happening.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Because the information wouldn't be shared across Oren.” ‎ George Galbraith: “No one is specifically approving it.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Rather, detailing what constitutes an eligibility for an exemption.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Of course, the prerogative whether to collect tax or not would simply lay as it is, with the hands of the Primary Officer.” ‎ George Galbraith: “It may not be as convenient, but it will solve the problem we face.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Da, you bring a fair point. Does anyone else have anything to say regarding this?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Are there any other questions?” ‎ George Galbraith: “If none, I motion to vote, then.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Seconded.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Carrion.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Niet.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mrs Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “On this matter, the ayes are seven and the nays are one. The bill is passed.” ‎ VOTE ON THE EXEMPTION ACT AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith Wick Carrion Bykov NAY Kortrevich ABSENT O. Barclay O’Rourke Baruch Christiansen Majority is achieved and the bill is passed. George Galbraith: “Thank you.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister President, let's begin on the tenants and terms regarding Mister Wick's bill.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Proceed.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Wick.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The floor is yours.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Quiet in the stands.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Thanks Ken.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “A nice ol'e read, and simple as can be,” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Something that was brought up to me recently.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Was that the Supreme Court is barred from business and enterprise.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If we are going to revoke their yearly income.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Then we must enable them, like Circuit Justices.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “To have the right of free enterprise.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Horrendous. I shan't have Supreme Court Justices ruling in favour of their own business interests.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Doesn't that allow for room of bias, then?” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Then how can we take away their only source of income?” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da, this also allows them to make far more.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Under the current law, this is their only income.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Potentially, if they work hard.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That's not how this works.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They are sent cases.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They don't pick them up.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Precisely, they seem to not pick up cases for long periods of time, seven years even.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “But that is not their job, Mister Kortrevich. They are sent these cases by the appeals and circuit courts.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They are asked to hear them.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye, and they often tarry for years on the matter.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Procedure bars them from asking, they must be asked.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Yet they do not do so in a timely fashion.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Mr. Wick can tell you that.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That's why we passed Swift Justice.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We passed a law compelling timely action.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Hmm. Then I propose we drop that amendment.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister Wicks, then?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “If Sir Wick does not agree to the amendment, then we shall vote on it.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Hang on.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Just so we're all clear here, are we discussing dropping this amendment all together? Or are we talking about opening the Justices for business interests?” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Just a minute.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I would rather them continue to get their yearly pay, knowing that we have created a time constraint to hear cases.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Instead of making their wage case by case. Especially if we are not giving them the chance to earn income elsewhere.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We can adjust the wage, mind you.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich, do you have a comment to make?” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “We did indeed pass the Swift Justice act, however it doesn't increase the will of the justices to complete more hearings. As there is no penalty for them not completing any trials.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “If anything, it simply gives criminals hope that the Supreme Court is rather lazy for their charge.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Like I said, Mister Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “This per case method of payment gives the judges a reward for making our system better.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The Justices are asked to hear them.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They do not ask to hear them.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “But they do not have to accept.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Hold one moment Mr Leader.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Yes, sir?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The per case payment is for circuit justices.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Circuit justices take cases.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The per year payment, if the amendment is dropped, is for Supreme Court justices.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Supreme Court Justices receive cases. They do not take them.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The Swift Justice act applies to circuit justices.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Does this clear up your confusion?” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I would like to counter that, the Supreme court may indeed receive cases, but they do not have to act on it.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They do.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Under which law?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Under convention, Mister Kortevich.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They hear cases with constitutional questions, largely.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Convention has clearly not been enough in the past.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Or, high treason charges.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “You can ask Mr. Wick to remind you of multiple times where they tarried for years.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Because there wasn't a law outlining the time frame.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Now we have that.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If they do not hear the case.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Then the ruling of the Circuit court remains the same.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Just one, really,” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “But it was a cataclysmic blunder on their part, I think.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Indeed, this is true. However, if the Supreme Court does let it pass through the timeout, it will likely have no affect on them personally.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If you are willing to take away consistent pay, you must be willing to allow them to pursue consistent pay elsewhere.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Allowing the ruling of the Circuit Court to stand isn't really justice in all cases.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If it is deemed a fair ruling, then justice has been served, Sir Wick.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I am in agreement with you in that, Sir Konstantin.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Were one to appeal a murder charge and they were innocent, they could be condemned to death because the Supreme Court remains slothful.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “There are circuit, appeals, and then the supreme court.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “The Supreme Court handles appeals.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Your right to appeal does not hinge on the supreme court.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Well, it relies on the Supreme Court taking and delivering a verdict on your appeal, yes.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Furthermore, like I have said.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We have.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We have passed a law creating the time frame.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “They are bound to it.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “But there are no penalties for the Supreme Court if they do not fit this frame.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Quite. My concern derived from the comment regarding upholding the Circuit verdict if the Supreme Court does not take the case.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If they are in violation of the law and their office, then there are penalties outlined in the O.R.C.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “You do not need to reiterate penalties that are already there within the law.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And this is not the point of the amendment, Mister Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I would argue that it is.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If this was a point you wished to raise, you should have when we were debating Swift Justice.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Which law outlines the penalties? I'm not familiar with it.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I have no issues with Swift Justice.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Though, mind you, this is probably something to be addressed with another bill.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “He seems to have fallen asleep, but Mr Barclay proposed removing the amendment from this bill.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “It seems we are in agreement that circuit justices must be paid, and because they can hold enterprise.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I do not mind it being per case.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “And keep paying them 500? I've taken a personal policy of abstaining from matters of the Treasury, but I think that unwise. The Supreme Court has improved in terms of haste, but not many cases reach it.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “It would be wasteful to spend so much on an institution that is not used very often.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I am very fine with lowering the wage.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Let's say that we did use this amendment per case, rather instead of a year. What's the demand on cases towards Supreme Court Justice in current times, I doubt there are many to support the livelihood of the Justices.” ‎ George Galbraith: “On the assumption of paying per case, that is.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “There isn't many cases. It's equivalent to paying a doorman a salary for a door used every few years.” ‎ George Galbraith: “It rather comes down to if there truly are enough cases being put towards the Supreme Court, where taking them per case, and paying them appropriately, is still enough to be equivalent to a judicial salary.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I for one can't support an annual salary.” ‎ George Galbraith: “The fact that the institution isn't used so often, supports Mister Elendil's point, in that if there aren't many cases, they cannot make a livelihood regardless, if we pay them per case.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “We should not be paying someone for a livelihood that isn't being earned, Drop the barring from enterprise if you will, but I do not support throwing money at a seldom-used institution.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Though, what bars me from a salary is the fact that it rather hemorrhages money from our budget.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Dropping the barring from enterprise is unacceptable.” ‎ George Galbraith: “It must be one or the other, I fear.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Supreme Court Justices cannot recuse themselves, letting them rule on their own business interests is insane.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I also consider it insanity to support a livelihood for people who only work every few years.” ‎ George Galbraith: “We must be reminded that many of these men have been solicitors of laws for years, decades even. I'm sure they recognize the ability to be neutral in a court of law.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And there is a criteria for what can be heard by the court.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “There is no such thing as neutrality in a case that you have a personal interest in.” ‎ George Galbraith: “They are appointed and confirmed on the faith that they put the Orenian rule of law above themselves.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “That's why we have recusal in the first place.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Listen, we're killing Ostromir here.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Again, I fear it comes down to simply two options, one or the other.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “What what what.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Just give the bastards their salary, I won't let you try to ruin the neutrality of the courts once again.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Is there a motion, gentlemen?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The motion to strike the first portion of the bill.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “You're referring to Article Two?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Turning the supreme courts salary into a by case wage.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I must again submit the financial irresponsibility of paying an institution 1,500 marks per year when they only recieve a case every few years.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, the motion is to strike Article Two from the bill. Does the author of the bill accept this change?” ‎ George Galbraith: “Then shall we lower the wage?” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Listen, we must think of it this way: These are people, we speak of. We are legislating on their lives and livlihoods of these men. They need and are deserving of a salary.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “A man only deserves what he works for.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “A yearly and consistent salary, at that.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And if you cannot let him work.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “In other areas.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Then you must let him work where he can.” ‎ George Galbraith: “They work, but the work is restricted based off of the demand of cases that are given.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick, do you accept the motion to strike Article Two from your bill?” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “I guarantee all of those men work their very hardest when they are called to.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Order.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I require an yes or a no, Sir Wick.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Shall we lower the wage then, Konstantin?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “As I maintain an ongoing abstention from treasury matters, you will have to submit the acceptence of the amendment to a vote, Mr. President.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, is there a second to the motion then?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Seconded.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Secon-.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “To be clear, gentlemen, this vote is on whether to strike Article Two from this bill.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Not on the bill in its entirety.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I myself shall abstain.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Naturally, I - Haha! I've never done that before!” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Uh, abstain.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Carrion.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Aye!” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Nice ring.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Niet.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mrs Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “On this, the ayes are five, the nays are one, and the abstentions are two. The motion does not pass.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The amendment stays.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Wait.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Absentee voting, Lukas.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We have to table this discussion and wait for the rest to vote.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Hear, hear!” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Ugh.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “In fact, you are correct. The motion shall be left to absentee voting. Apologies.” VOTE ON THE REMOVAL OF ARTICLE TWO FROM THE JUDICIARY SALARY ACT AYE Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith Carrion Bykov NAY Kortrevich ABSTAIN Rakoczy Wick ABSENT O. Barclay O’Rourke Baruch Christiansen Majority is NOT achieved and the matter shall be decided by way of absentee voting. Members shall have twenty-four Saint’s hours to vote. The matter requires TWO votes to achieve a majority. ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Legislation is a tedious process. We must be patient.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Indeed.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “And then we have to wait for the next session to pass Circuit wages?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Yes.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Can we not just quickly split the bill in two?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I'm afraid not, Mr Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Anything else on the agenda or may we adjourn?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “This bill shall be tabled then, until the next session.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I believe we are done.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “I motion to adjourn.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Seconded!” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “This sitting of the Diet is adjourned.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Thank you all.”
  11. CANDIDACY DECLARATION FORM _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ PERSONAL INFORMATION Surname: Rakoczy First Name: Lukas Address of Residence: Amelya 4, New Reza Age: 38 Partisan Affiliation: Independent ((Username: Pureimp10)) _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ELIGIBILITY QUESTIONNAIRE Are you registered and eligible to vote in the Holy Orenian Empire? Have you filled out the census? Yes Do you have any other title, peerage, or military assignment that may conflict with becoming a Member of the House of Commons, as per the Edict of Reform (1763)? No If yes, do you understand that you will be required to resign or abdicate from this position should you be elected to the House of Commons, and if this does not occur your seat shall be considered to be vacant?: N/A
  12. SITTING OF THE 18TH IMPERIAL DIET TOBIAS’ BOUNTY, 1783 Present: Jonah Stahl-Elendil; Conrad Barclay; Osvald Barclay; George Galbraith; Padraig O’Rourke; Sigmar Baruch; Angelika Bykov; Lauritz Christiansen. Absent: Lukas Rakoczy; Konstantin Wick; Ostromir Carrion; Juliyus Kortrevich. Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Congratulations, you made it on time.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I did.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “His Honourable, Excellenc-, Archancellery is here.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Then, Leader of the House, I do beckon you to present the agenda so we can begin.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Let's give the folks a few more minutes.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Rakoczy and Wick won't be coming. Anyone else can show up.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “We're above quorum, no point in waiting the extra three minutes.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Hrm, very well then.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Fellow colleagues of the House of Commons, as you all know, I have been granted his Imperial Majesty's confidence to form his government.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “So, in order to do so, in this deadlocked Diet.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I ask for a voice vote of confidence in the Stahl-Elendil Ministry, and it's new Council of State.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “To avoid a snap election.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And to allow us to govern properly, in a new era for the Diet, where the Ministry and the Diet are connected by compelling social convention.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Ah, a new invention, how curious. Shall we proceed it as a simple vote, then?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Everyone votes aye or nay?” ‎ George Galbraith: “I'd assume so.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Yes, Sir Christiansen. Now, I implore you all to vote Aye. President Rakoczy has agreed to this deal.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Do you resire to hold a speech, or shall we begin the vote?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I would like to name my council picks for you all today.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “So you know who is what.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “For Vice Chancellor, Franz Nikolai Sarkozy. For Ministry of the Interior, Mr Padraig O'Rourke.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “For Intelligence, Mr. Arnaud de Ruyter. For Lord Lieutenant of Reza, Sir Osvald Barclay.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “For foreign affairs, Ms.Celestine Herbert.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “For Ministry of Justice, Tirilan Sentinel.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “General Alren de Nurem, Mr Victor Halcourt, and Mr George Galbraith, shall retain their positions.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “With this now known to you all, I ask for your vote of confidence.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Shall we begin, then?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Yes.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Mister Conrad Barclay.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Mister Osvald Barclay.” ‎ Sir Osvald Barclay: “After much deliberation on the role of Lord Lieutenant for Haense...” ‎ Sir Osvald Barclay: “I vote aye.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Sir Sigmar Baruch.” ‎ Sir Sigmar Baruch: “Aye.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Miss Angelika Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Aye.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Sir Lauritz Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Mister George Galbraith.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “George has fallen asleep.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Mister Padraig O'Rourke,” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “And lastly, Mister Jonah Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “And with seven ayes, and one asleep, the motion of confidence in the Stahl-Elendil Ministry passes.” ‎ VOTE ON THE CONFIDENCE OF THE HOUSE IN THE STAHL-ELENDIL MINISTRY AYE Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay O. Barclay Galbraith O’Rourke Baruch Bykov Christiansen ABSENT Rakoczy Wick Carrion Kortrevich Majority is achieved and the bill is passed. Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Thank you very much.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “All of you.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Now, let us begin this new government.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Congratulations, again, Archchancellor Elendil.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Oh, George is awake!” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Thank God for that, now, continue, dear Leader of the House.” ‎ George Galbraith: “I hope this sets the floor for a trustful relationship between the Diet and the Council of State.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “About damn time, Typical Galbraith work ethic.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Gentlemen.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We can bully George later.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Padraig I haven't seen you in the Interior at all.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Both of you, shut it.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Let the Arch-Chancellor speak.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Now, seeing as Mr. Wick is not present to discuss his Judicial compensation bill.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And its amendment, and as there are no other bills on the docket.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Let's open the floor up, to questions, concerns, ideas.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And then call it an evening.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Do you need any judges?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Several.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Good, good, send me a letter after the next election.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Any suggestions for now, actually?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Is that to me?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If there are any suggestions and recommendations.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “For Circuit Justices.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Myself, obviously. Not sure on others, but I'll investigate it.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Also, do make the judiciary create a Judicial Gazette, with all of their verdicts and such.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “And have the Supreme Court review it, to assure that no major mistakes are being made.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I shall inform the Attorney-General he has another duty.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “With that being said...” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Anything else? Going once...” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Ought we not just vote on Mr. Wick's bill? It's simple enough, I doubt he'd mind.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Ah, additionally!” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We opted to make a more comprehensive bill.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Which is why it was tabled.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “As he is not here to discuss these changes.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “It wouldn't be right to move forward.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Is this acceptable, Mr.Barclay?” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Right, now, with that all said.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Did you have something else, Sir Christiansen?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Nevermind it, I'll take it up with Celestine.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Very well.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I move to adjourn this meeting.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Seconded.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Very well.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Thank you all for coming.”
  13. SITTING OF THE 18TH IMPERIAL DIET HOREN’S CALLING, 1782 Present: Lukas Rakoczy; Jonah Stahl-Elendil; Conrad Barclay; Osvald Barclay; George Galbraith; Padraig O’Rourke; Konstantin Wick; Ostromir Carrion; Juliyus Kortrevich; Angelika Bykov. Lauritz Christiansen. Absent: Sigmar Baruch; Lukas Rakoczy: “This sitting of the Diet is now in session.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mister Leader, what is on the agenda for the day?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Mister President, Member Lauritz has a bill he would like us to address first.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Yes, yes! I may have a family emergency during this meeting, so I petitioned to Jonah that we do it first.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Hopefully I can stick around the entire session, though.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “May, I uh, introduce the bill?” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “This is extremely simple, my fellow Members of the House of Commons. It is a pension for all us who are and have been civil servants.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Our work often goes unnoticed, and it goes particularly unpaid.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “This will ensure that once we retire from these lives, we may live to a certain degree of prosperity rather than ending up on the streets.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “That is about all. I am open to questions.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The floor is open to unmoderated debate.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Please, someone say something.” ‎ Sir Osvald Barclay: “Can you give an example of an inadquate 'post-diet life'?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I support this bill.” ‎ Sir Osvald Barclay: “Just curious, I support the bill as well.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Vivaca Rutledge had to squat in my house after her retirement.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Likewise, Terrence May barely made a living after he returned to his livelihood.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “May we move this to a vote then?” ‎ Sir Osvald Barclay: “Well, I have nothing more to say, I think we should vote, to be honest.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I second.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Or third.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Sir Osvald Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Sorry ah'm late.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr O'Rourke.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Actually we'll allow you to read over the bi- alright then.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Nay.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Carrion.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The ayes are eight, the nays are one, and the bill is passed.” VOTE ON THE HONORABLE LIFE ACT AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil O. Barclay Galbraith O’Rourke Carrion Kortrevich Christiansen NAY Wick ABSENT C. Barclay Baruch Bykov Majority is achieved and the bill is passed. Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Woo baby!” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Catch me at Las Palmas next election period.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “What is next, Mister Leader?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Right, now that Sir Lauritz has secured his retirement fund.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Onto something for normal people.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We in the Josephite Bench present to the chamber for consideration, the Swift Justice Act.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The concerns of the citizenry, especially those in Haense and Kaedrin, regarding the inconsistency in trial times.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And backlogging of court cases, have been heard.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Take a minute to read over if you had not already done so.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “We'll proceed to unmoderated debate once all members have had the chance to read over the bill.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “If an indictment is not filled with the allowed time, what is the course of action that follows?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Then it has not be filed.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Yet this has never been the case.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And this is only in regards to criminal trials following arrest.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Civil court cases do not hold indictments, as you know.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Then I am of the understanding that if no indictment, or information, is filed within this three day period, all charges are dropped.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Yes.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Understood, that is all from me.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Well, it should account for periods of investigation.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Sir Konstantin, it does.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Because an investigation will happen before an arrest is made.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Oh, fair enough, then.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “I motion to vote…?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Seconded.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Sir Osvald Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr O'Rourke.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Carrion.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Aye!” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “On this matter, the ayes are nine and the nays are zero. The bill is passed.” VOTE ON THE SWIFT AND FAIR JUSTICE ACT AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil O. Barclay Galbraith O’Rourke Wick Carrion Kortrevich Christiansen ABSENT C. Barclay Baruch Bykov Majority is achieved and the bill is passed. ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Very good, gentlemen.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Let's hope this fixes the backlog in the courts.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Now, we move onto the Judicial Salary Ammendment.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Sir Konstantin Wick, step forward.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Ah, yes,” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Verrrrry simple, gentlemen. Instead of paying the Supreme Court 500 marks each per year, we pay them per case handled.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Simple!” ‎ George Galbraith: “Seems simple.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “If that's all, we'll move into unmoderated debate.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Prseent the document, please.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Article I states that a case is defined as any legal proceeding that requires input of the Supreme Court, does this include denied motions.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Sir Wick, you have not included whether or not their duty of judicial review is applicable or not.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “That would be included under the definition of case.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Perhaps it might be better to say 100 for any matter NOT in trial, and then 500 for actual trials?” ‎ George Galbraith: “It seems like a broad definition- one to include things like judicial review as ap roceeding, aye.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I would be in agreement, but I am starkly against any payment for specifically denied motions.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Konstantin, this might end up costing the treasury more money than not.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I can agree t othat, aye.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Well, if we're all in agreement, we can keep it to payment only for trial. I don't mind, really.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If we're going to compensate them for their work, it has to be for all their work.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da, tha' would be acceptable.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da, but you must understand that payment for a simple denial is a slippery slope.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “To be honest, if Circuit Justices can go without pay for all their work, I think we have room to wiggle regarding what the Supreme Court gets paid for.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I think you raise a good point in that this could cost us a little if we take the wrong approach.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “So. Either we pay them ONLY for cases, or offer decreased payment for work outside of court, excluding denials.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “If they hear a case for judicial review, it does become a court case in itself.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “You mean outside of criminal court.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I believe a reduced payment for all cases is satisfactory.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Furthermore, why don't we pay Circuit judges?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Very good. What would you say is appropriate? George, perhaps you want to weigh in, too.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Either or, though, perhaps paying them per trial is reflective of what the money is going to.” ‎ George Galbraith: “I'd imagine it acts as an incentive as well, to take up more trials.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Didn't you have something that was stuck in the pipeline for a while, Sir Wick?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I did? I'm not sure what you're referring to.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That was circuit court, Konstantin.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Ah, my mistake then.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “The intention of this bill was to remove the 500 per YEAR payment for the Supreme Court. As to what they actually get paid, I'm happy to shape based on the opinion's of this House.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “So long as we agree it should be by workload and not time.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “No worries folks I struck him down.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Perhaps we should invest in locks on our doors.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Anyway!” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Now, ah, where were we?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Apologies folks, that attacker needed to be taken down.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Please continue Sir Wick.” ‎ George Galbraith: “So we are retaining the 500 mina even for a different use case?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Ah, yes. The actual payment.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Right.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I say three hundred per case heard.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “I propose we keep it simple, gentlemen, and leave it to 500 payment per case heard in court.” ‎ George Galbraith: “That's fair, Mister Elendil.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “I agree with Sir Wick.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Hrm.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I agree with Mister Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Perhaps now we can use this time to discuss our Circuit Court Judges.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “500 a year is ridiculous, though cases do not come so often. Surely Sir Wick knows that better than us all. I believe we should trust his judgement.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We can call it 400 for the Supreme.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Seems like compromise.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “250 For Circuit?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Circuit judges keep vanishing.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Hm.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “If we're going to pay the Circuit, I say we table this and chat with the Treasury first.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “How about 500 for the Supreme and 300 for the Circuit?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I motion to table this bill until next meeting.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Agreed.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Hmm...da, agreed.” ‎ George Galbraith: “What was the initial reason for Circuit Judges not being payed, but Supreme Court jduges being payed?” ‎ George Galbraith: “There must've been a reason.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “We're tabling, then, Mister President, to make this into a broader bill on judicial payment.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Aye, agreed.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Now...” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Er, is Mister Barclay coming back?” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well, the motion shall be tabled.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “After the incident we just went through, I'm not sure.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “We shall continue, nevertheless.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Unless there is nothing left on the agenda?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We will not be hearing the Barclay impeachment bill today.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Sorry, Barclay-Baruch.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Anything else?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “We call Sir Konstantin to the lectern.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “To present his Lord Lieutenancy bill.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Right-o,” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Lord-Lieutenants, is a bit of a weird one, for those of you unaware. They sit on the Council of State as liaison for certain provinces, facilitating communication, advisement and applying national law in the provicnes.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “This Bill tidies up a lot of the legal language from the original bill, and a better mechanism for appointing them. Take a look.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The Provincial government cannot deny the pick.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The floor is open to unmoderated debate.” ‎ George Galbraith: “What is the difference between the current system, and what this asks to implement?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Just a moment, folks.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Ahem.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Gentlemen, I shall give you two more Saint's minutes before I adjourn. The bill can simply be heard at the next sitting.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Just one more minute, Mister President.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Ahem. Apologies, gentlemen. We're done discussing.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Please peruse the bill at your leisure, and holler with any questions.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Do you wish to speak regarding your changes or shall we move to debate, Sir Wick?” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “We've just made a small edit on the selection of Lord-Lieutenants, in Article III, to say that Cabinet will select an officer from a list provided by a Provincial Government, and a Provincial Government cannot shoot down the selection.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “That's all. If there's no questions I motion we vote.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “I second.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “The motion is heard and seconded. I shall call the roll.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Stahl-Elendil.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Barclay.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “I shall allow you to read the bill and come back to you later.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ Conrad Barclay: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Galbraith.” ‎ George Galbraith: “I'll vote aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr O'Rourke.” ‎ Padraig O'Rourke: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Wick.” ‎ Sir Konstantin Wick: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Carrion.” ‎ Ostromir Carrion: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mr Kortrevich.” ‎ Juliyus Kortrevich: “Da.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Mrs Bykov.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Aye.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Sir Christiansen.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Abstain.” ‎ Sir Lauritz Christiansen: “Actually, nay.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “On this matter, the ayes are nine and the nays are one. The bill is passed.” VOTE ON THE LIEUTENANCY ACT AYE Rakoczy Stahl-Elendil C. Barclay Galbraith O’Rourke Wick Carrion Kortrevich Bykov NAY Christiansen ABSENT O. Barclay Baruch Majority is achieved and the bill is passed. ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Is that it for the day, Mister Leader?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “That is it.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very well.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Before we adjourn, I believe I speak on behalf of all of us when I wish you the best of luck in your new role as Archchancellor.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Actually.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Oh?” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Oh, thank you.” ‎ George Galbraith: “Cheers.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I was going to say, expect an address in the newspaper.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “Next meeting I'll be coming with lists and things to discuss.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Very good.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “The successes of the Basrid Ministry are plenty.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “And there are more to be found under the Elendil Ministry.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “In the meanwhile, God bless you all.” ‎ Jonah Stahl-Elendil: “I look forward to our next meeting.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “With that, this sitting is adjourned.” ‎ Angelika Bykov: “Indeed. I am certain you will do well as Arch-Chancellor.” ‎ Lukas Rakoczy: “Thank you all.”
  14. STATEMENT FROM THE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF COMMONS The House thanks counsel for the Defendant for its appeal to the Supreme Court, however is puzzled as to the existence of such an appeal. Per the Legal Procedure Act of 1772, there exists no document titled ‘Motion to Dismiss’, and as such the House expresses both confusion and concern as to why the Ministry of Justice is inventing documents. Nevertheless, even if we were to accept that this is a valid and legally sound motion, it would have no bearing regardless as a trial of impeachment is merely a procedural mechanism for the Diet to decide whether or not to proceed with a Writ of Impeachment, and not a real legal trial under the purview of the Judiciary. There are no legal requirements as to how this trial must be conducted, as it is entirely a procedural construct of the legislative branch as part of its impeachment deliberations. It holds no force of law; it merely advises the Diet if and when a Writ of Impeachment should be brought to a vote, and as such is not subject to legal procedure or appeal. The House will instead afford the Ministry of Justice the presumption that this is a mistake, if a concerning one, and that they instead meant to submit this ‘Motion’ as a Judicial Review per the Legal Procedure Act of 1772. The House, however, submits that there exists insufficient grounds for Judicial Review on this occasion. In the absence of any law providing for impeachment procedure, there exists no grounds upon which the Defendant can submit the conduct of the House for judicial review. The Oren Revised Code provides impeachment law only regarding ‘Writs of Impeachment’, which, absent a definition, the House submits its the product of a formal impeachment vote expelling an impeached official from office, which shall be explained in depth in section II of this affidavit. However, no ‘Writ of Impeachment’ has been issued, and therefore there is nothing to be reviewed. As such, the existence of this motion lacks the requirements for judicial review, as the House’s conduct thus far does not pertain to any provisions of the Oren Revised Code, and nor shall it until a formal impeachment vote is held and a Writ of Impeachment is produced, should such a vote succeed. Therefore, the Court is asked to disregard this motion. In the event that it chooses to consider it, which the House would submit is legally erroneous, a response to the claims made by counsel for the Defendant shall be provided below. I: On ‘No Confidence’ Counsel for the Defendant will duly note that his quoted passage of the Oren Revised Code refers to: 602.016 - Writs of Impeachment, concerning the impeachment of a member of the Council of State for offenses of a categorically serious extent, such as ‘improperly exceeding or abusing the powers of their office’, or ‘using their office for an improper purpose or for personal gain’. In the absence of a provided category other than two examples, we must operate on the standard of an ‘offence to a serious extent’. Thus, in the lack of an exhaustive category, the House is at liberty to submit its interpretations as to what constitutes an ‘offence of serious extent’. To suggest that the above listed examples are the only possible grounds for impeachment is incorrect, as is explicitly provided by use of the words ‘such as’. Thus, the House submits that a lack of confidence in the Secretary’s abilities to perform his duties competently constitutes a serious issue that gives rise to impeachment. While uncertain as to why counsel for the Defendant references ORC 602.044 which makes provisions regarding diplomacy, the House is thankful that counsel for the Defendant has cited the duties of confirmation of the House, upon which this vote of no confidence is staked. As candidates for Secretarial positions are required to achieve a majority confirmation vote within the House, we must thus take this as implied law that the confidence of the House is required for a Secretarial candidate to become a Secretary and that the importance of such a vote is enshrined specifically in law. Summarily, the House duly submits that the loss of the confidence legally required for them to enter into office constitutes a fundamental breach of the criteria to maintain a Secretarial position. To put it simply, the Secretary would not have come into his office without a majority vote of confidence from the House as representative of the Orenian public. The House is of the opinion that such confidence no longer exists, which shall be verified in a formal vote following the impeachment proceedings if applicable, and thus the Secretary is no longer qualified to continue in office. II: On ‘Impeachment Inquiry’ It is the opinion of the House that a Writ of Impeachment would be published upon a formal vote within the House to impeach the Defendant, with the Writ being the formal product removing the Secretary from office. The House therefore submits, in the absence of binding law, that a two-third majority vote is required to formally impeach the Defendant, and not to begin an impeachment inquiry. The House similarly submits that the ancient precedent cited from a different political system has no binding authority on these proceedings in question. Counsel for the Defendant will note that the Oren Revised Code does not provide any legal definition or requirement for precedent regarding the House of Commons, and thus any obligation to adhere by precedent exists purely as a formality, which the House is at liberty to depart from should it deem the circumstances appropriate. In the present case, the House is of the opinion that to delay the impeachment proceedings to humour a vote for an impeachment inquiry is just that - a delay. The House is intent on pursuing such proceedings, and so if this non-binding precedent from a different political system is enforced, it would serve only as a bureaucratic delay to the productive functioning of the House. In summation, the House submits that a Writ of Impeachment is the product of formal impeachment and not the initiation of an inquiry, that it is under no obligation to adhere to a proposed precedent from an old political system with no legal standing, and that any such precedent would constitute a meaningless delay. III: On the Previous Impeachment Inquiry The House submits that counsel for the Defendant is incorrectly interpreting the cancellation of the impeachment inquiry into the Defendant in 1774 as complete acquittal of the charges described therein. The House thus advises counsel for the Defendant the inquiry was not pursued owing to inconsistencies among the testimonies in relation to a particular charge. That there existed insufficient or erroneous evidence at the time to impeach the Defendant does not mean that he was acquitted, for no formal inquiry was ever held. As such, The interpretation that the abandonment of the 1774 inquiry as complete acquittal is legally incorrect. The House now reaffirms that this abandonment is an abandonment, and not a defeated attempt at impeachment. As such, the charges were never formally explored nor voted upon, and as such the Secretary is explicitly not acquitted of them. Instead, the House decided not to pursue these charges at the time due to insufficient and erroneous evidence, which is not the case with the present inquiry. IV: Improper Investigation The House finds counsel for the Defendant’s final few paragraphs to be unnecessary repetition of arguments refuted earlier in this affidavit. Ergo, the House submits that, in the absence of detailed law governing the procedures of impeachment, it has acted perfectly within its jurisdiction in beginning an impeachment inquiry, and that it is, again, under no obligation to adhere to precedent from a different political system that would achieve absolutely nothing other than bureaucratic delay of no longer than three Saint days. As such, the House is free to conduct investigations and inquiries as its leisure.
  15. A letter from the Office of the President of the House of Commons. “To the Secretary of the Interior, You allege that the ‘no confidence’ charge is unconstitutional and never seen before, and accuse me of breaking the law in including such in the inquiry. However, this is the first impeachment inquiry to ever progress beyond the announcement stage. Additionally, the House of Commons, as the elected representatives of the Orenian people, are charged with the confirmation of Secretaries to their offices once satisfied that these individuals are the best-suited for the role and will deliver to the Orenian people. Thus it must also hold true that there exists an obligation for the House to ensure that this suitability and delivery is consistent in the same way that a General would not be appointed based on his performance at a single point in time. Thus, the House duly believes a lack of confidence, on behalf of the Orenian people, as an appropriate charge to pursue impeachment. The House has, in its previous investigations including your recent hearing from the previous Saint’s day, established reasonable grounds for concluding these concerns to be valid, with regard to: Contempt of Diet; Failure to maintain adequate records to a negligent degree; Abuse of office to obtain a reduced price for land; Blatantly insubstantial dismissal of Interior employees. I am but a servant of the people, as are my fellow members of the House. To accuse us of disregarding the people and playing politics is nothing but an attempt to subvert justice. Until your day in court, I would advise you to prepare your defense for your trial. Should you have any further questions regarding the inquiry, please send them in private to my office. I would be more than happy to answer. Signed, President of the Commons”
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