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[✓] [Aengudaemon Lore] Yeu Rthulu - Aengul of Contentment and Compassion

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Yeu Rthulu, Aengul of Compassion, Contentment, and Kindness.

 

Origin/Background

In the ancient days of yore, in the time when aenguls and daemons walked on the mortal plane, there was an aengul by the 

name of Abimalech. A wily and uncouth aengul, young in those days, Abimalech stirred much trouble within the celestial

realms. Not associated with any title, nor any realm, Abimalech acted entirely for herself, and for no purpose. And their self

centered exploits earned the ire of many of the aengudaemonic pantheon.  

 

 Tired of Abimalech’s delinquency and idiocy, the other aengudaemons convened together, and captured Abimalech. They stripped

the aengul of her divine powers and abilities, yet saw it too cruel to kill the aengul for her misdeeds, however they saw her too

self absorbed to be reprimanded, and than let go, for surely she would return for some form of revenge, whether such attempt

would be successful or not, they did not care, for it would be trouble greatly unneeded. As such, they resolved that Abimalech

should be thrown to the mortal plane, as to live out her days as a mortal, never again to return to her former power. Abimalech

was cast out from the heavens, and thrown to the mortal plane.

 

In a flash of lightning, Abimalech found herself in the snow. They were naked, and could feel the burn of the cold biting at their

flesh. However, as Abimalech sat and wept in the snow, her shoulder was shook by a older man. The man, a cobbler by the name of 

Yeu Carseth, was returning home from an excursion to a nearby town to pick up some leather and wheat-grain, and was 

 interrupted by the sound of a lightning strike nearby. Briefly abandoning his leather and grain on the side of the snowy road, the

cobbler had gone to investigate the lightning strike, however, he found but a lone, naked woman, huddled within the snow.

The cobbler took his cloak from his back and wrapped it around Abimalech’s shoulders, and brought the fallen diety to his 

cottage. Abimalech was clothed, fed, and tended to by Yeu and his family who had no knowledge of who this stranger was.

Abimalech, who had resigned hours before that she should die alone and afraid, was shocked by the cobbler’s kindness, and in a 

uncharacteristic fit of thankfulness, swore himself to Yeu’s service. Yeu, who was but a cobbler, took Abimalech as his apprentice,

and taught the diety the art of making shoes. Abimalech hid her true nature from Yeu and his family, gaining a newfound 

humbleness from her circumstance. Eventually, Abimalech took for herself a wife from Yeu’s household, and became as a daughter to

Yeu, and there was no greater closeness as there was between Abimalech and Yeu.

 

Yeu Carseth was fair in his teaching of Abimalech, and instructed hher on all things that were good in this world. The two spoke 

daily on matters of goodness and morality. Yeu became wise with his discussions with Abimalech, and Abimalech even wiser so.

Abimalech learned from Yeu all that was right with the world, and with the fortitude only a aengul might have, acted upon said

teachings to their fullest extent. Just, fair, kind and forgiving in all her dealings, Abimalech was honored among the people of the villages.

Her most notable deed was when a young man was to be blinded, and cast from the village for misdeeds, Abimalech

volunteered that he may be given another chance, when the village wisdom explained ‘it is written that such misdeeds must be 

repayed with the loss of two eyes’, Abimalech volunteered one of her own.

 

Eventually, through the years Yeu Carseth grew ill, and his eyes could no longer see and his hands could no longer work.

Abimalech cared for Yeu as if her father, and spent every coin from her cobble work for the purpose of ensuring Yeu’s comfort.

Yeu, on his deathbed asked not for his children to sit by his side nor his family, but only Abimalech, of whom there was no greater

closeness. With his final words, Yeu asked not of Abimalech her past, nor her origins, but asked only that Abimalech would do

one thing once he passed: That when he departed, Abimalech would forgo his title and name, and take Yeu’s, so that his name 

should forever more be associated with one of his own heart. And as such, the fallen diety was called Abimalech no more, but Yeu.

 

Abimalech, now henceforth referred to as Yeu, (not to be mistaken from here on for Yeu Carseth, whom is now dead.)

remained in the village there-after with her wife, and was honored with many marks upon her flesh with holy redstone ink,

she forgot her time as an aengul, and prayed at the temple to false gods she knew were not real, and whose names would be 

forgotten. Yet, in those days of yore, true gods, aengudaemons, walked along the world. And it came to pass that in the village 

Yeu had made her home, in the temple sanctifying false idols of metal and bone, a aengul entered in. Incensed by the worship 

of false gods, the aengul demanded that the idols be destroyed, and that new idols, and a new faith be created of actual gods,

lest the temple, and all who’ve dared follow the false gods be destroyed. Yeu, whom appeared to the aengul as but a honored

shoemaker with red tattoos and one eye, rose to speak to the aengul on equal terms, pleading for the sake of the temple  and the

village, that false or not, worship was but a choice. The aengul however was angered by Yeu’s words, and summoned forth great 

tongues of flame and cracks of lightning, and sought to smite Yeu from the world, yet, Yeu took forth a dagger from her belt, and

threw it upon the aengul, who in his hubris thought none strong enough to resist his fury, and Yeu’s dagger thence smote the 

aengul in the throat, and the aengul was felled.

 

The divine power from the aengul left its body, and as Yeu went to check the aengul and his wounds, the divine power re-entered

Yeu, and thus Yeu glowed, and looked as to all who watched as the shining sun. Those of the temple proclaimed Yeu as goddess,

and dubbed her the term ‘R’Thul-ul’ (meaning, glowing one), and thus she was called, Yeu Rthulu.

 

Yeu Rthulu ascended from the temple in a flash of light, and the roof of the temple was smote, and bore in it a great seared hole.

Yeu Rthulu siezed the empty realm of the violent aengul, and made it as her own. And she returned to the village in a days time,

through the very hole she created, and spoke and ate with her family, proclaiming a place for all whom should choose upon their

death, and she wrote upon clay tablets her teachings, and her wisdom she had learned in life. And there she ascended once more,

taking with her her wife, and a portion of snow, as to prepare for the ones she loved. And in her realm there was Yeu Carseth, of

whom there were no greater closeness to, and Yeu Carseth, Yeu Rthulu, and her wife, embraced, for the end had come, and it was fair.

 

Realm

Yeu Rthulu’s realm is that which is known as Kavenjun, of whose purpose is mainly to serve as an afterlife to those whom would fit in such.

It is not what would be known as an objective ‘paradise’, for life is Kavenjun is notably similar to life in the mortal plane, however, it is

gentle. In Kavenjun there is no death, disease, plague, or famine. There exists in that realm no evil, or malign intent. Souls exist in bodies

of their choosing, and want for little. Books are written, items are made, food is grown, and snow is shoveled. Works of art unmatched in

the mortal realm are made from artists with such abilities of expression and understanding that their minds would break if brought back to

mundane realms, those depressed and tired of life find a place for rest so long as they wish, being as sleeping men, dreaming for

100s upon 100s of years, unless awoken either when they tire of their dreaming, or from the will of another. There exists spouses and lovers,

departed from eachother in life but re-united after, who remain hand in hand for millenia, love’s expression reaching its pinnacle in life after death.

With the newly found soul essence gained from her followers in the mortal plane, children are now born in Kavenjun, and there they’re raised knowing no evil or hate. Yeu herself lives among the souls of Kavenjun, hearing and answering their pleas, and speaking to all the souls she cares for as equals.

Following

 

Yeu is careful and slow in her choosing of followers, for not only must they represent her in the mortal planes, they must also

be suitable for the realm of Kavenjun. Her followers she treats not as lessers, not as pawns to be used, but as equals. Mayhaps

unknowing, but in the end viewing them as equally capable, unless proven otherwise. In the past, she sought augurs, physical

bastions of her kindness within the mortal realm to serve as ambassadors for her will, however, such was in the end folly.

As of current, her followers are a few and careful bunch. Her  gifts are as helpful to her followers, as they’re to her. For those

blessed with her gifts are given boons in their daily life of which are unequal,  and in return, they expend from themselves but

unneeded, and returning soul essence, which Yeu uses to fortify and upkeep the realm of  Kavenjun, as well as weave together

new souls within the bodies of couples, and those seeking children. Yeu quietly pushes her followers to expand their influence,

to pull more to the flock. She speaks to her followers in dreams and visions, and  advises them on things that which her

worldly teachings do not address. She encourages and re-assures her followers to continue, and multiply

their good work, and to act in ever better ways.

         

Present Day

 

Yeu, in the modern times is quiet in her dealings with the outside world. Though she cares greatly for mortals, she

bears a great understanding of what is needed, and what is not. Though she is far from cowardly, she tempers her

interaction with mortals, both to not cause any problems herself, or her precious realm of Kavenjun. Most of Yeu’s active

time is spent tending to her realm, whether through fortifying it against  celestial threats that should aim to take from the

realm, or through simple communication and quality time with those within her realm.  Yeu continues to quietly seek out

more followers, wishing to add those suitable to the flock, both to grant a place in Kavenjun, and also to gain 

more soul essence to assist with said realm.

 

However, this is not to say that Yeu shall not act in the mortal realm, yet such is rare. Whether through patrons or proxies, Yeu is

cautious when interacting with mortals, and she aims to minimize any risk she could put herself, or her followers in. This mindset

is what as led her magic boons she has granted her followers to be both benign and non-combative.

 

Yeu is equally motivated by  a love for her followers, and a deep sense of wrongness in the mortal world, hence her retrofitting of Kavenjun to be better place for

mortals. Her strictures in the end serve not as just a guide for mortals to live their life in the mortal plane, but as conditioning for

the realm of Kavenjun. Yeu in truth despises the mortal realm, and she sees it as salvation to bring those willing to Kavenjun.

Yet, she tempers her ‘salvation’, as she knows the balance she keeps in her realm- even if its lasted for millenia, is delicate.

 

Yeu is an outlier from most of the workings of the other aengudaemons, and has little interaction with any of them,

seeming predisposed for aengudaemonic hermitage. She notably bears a distaste for the more violent or dogmatic ones.

or those whom attempt to cleave for themselves their own mortal souls by force, and has had conflicts with Tahariae in

the past. Her place in the celestial realms is separate from that of others, and for Yeu Rthulu, that is exactly to her preference.

 

Purpose (OOC)

 

In the world of Lord of The Craft, gods, aenguls, daemons, dieties, are usually self-interested beings with an agenda.  

These agendas vary madly, and range wildly in their moral implications, and though some can be viewed as generally benign,

there will usually be some form of underlying scummy-ness, if not just blatant selfishness at the expense of descendants, or 

other aenguls or daemons. Though some have motive that align with mortals, rarely do these gods ever actually care about

them more than just as a tool to have their goals met.

I find these all to be massive problems. Though I am fine with there being scummy dieties, I find it an issue that ALL of these

gods are scummy. However, just making a nonsensically compassionate god wouldnt work, as though that’d fit a niche, it would

thematic (and quite possibly physical) suicide.

Yeu is an answer to these problems, in what I hope is a satisfying and relatively unique way. Yeu is kind and compassionate, yet

not stupid or non-pragmatic. Her motivations more align with an evil diety, though her actions are what secure her as indisputably

good. Her backstory gives context for her actions, and explains why she does what she does, and explains why she of all aenguls

would not have the same sort’ve scummyness and view of mortals.

 

 

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A question for you.

 

Is it necessarily bad that LOTC lore is grim and dark, and is it necessary to alleviate that?

 

I’m far from an expert on Aengudaemons, but if the vast majority are self-servient and driven by their own agendas, then might it possibly feel out of place for one of their number to act so uncharacteristically?

 

There’s no right or wrong answer to the above, it’s just a matter for discussion.

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17 minutes ago, Xarkly said:

A question for you.

 

Is it necessarily bad that LOTC lore is grim and dark, and is it necessary to alleviate that?

 

I’m far from an expert on Aengudaemons, but if the vast majority are self-servient and driven by their own agendas, then might it possibly feel out of place for one of their number to act so uncharacteristically?

  

 There’s no right or wrong answer to the above, it’s just a matter for discussion.

 

I personally think something being too grimdark for a roleplay server is a problem to an extent. Roleplay is used by most as a means of escapism, a means by which to go outside the dreary world we live in, and in most standard fantasy that has a large emphasis on gods, there is atleast a few gods that are pretty fine and ok. I try to give fair reasoning for why Yeu would be different, and make a satisfying narrative to justify an aengul with a more kind attitude. 

 

The concept that our characters are involved with godlike entities masquerading as proper dieties, and making false promises by which to gain the favor, or power of mortals is a concept that I do believe can make great roleplay, and is something very interesting to consider, however, with nearly any kind of creature in any game, book, or other media, I very much enjoy a break from the stereotypes. (Creatures like Mursaat in GW2, an entire race known to be emotionally complex and bear the same feelings as people- with every single one being unequivocally evil very much bother me.)

 

The concept that these standardly self-serving creatures can have an individual who acts with great compassion to ones commonly viewed as lesser is a fantastic mirror to humanity in my opinion. Though there is an arguement that most human individuals are standardly self-serving, we still get people who can act with great charity, selflessness, and kindness.

 

There is also the arguement to be made that Yeu herself acts with charity and kindness, just cause it makes her feel good, and she has strong morals and convictions about such.

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19 minutes ago, Quavinir_Twiceborn said:

 

I personally think something being too grimdark for a roleplay server is a problem to an extent. Roleplay is used by most as a means of escapism, a means by which to go outside the dreary world we live in, and in most standard fantasy that has a large emphasis on gods, there is atleast a few gods that are pretty fine and ok. I try to give fair reasoning for why Yeu would be different, and make a satisfying narrative to justify an aengul with a more kind attitude. 

 

The concept that our characters are involved with godlike entities masquerading as proper dieties, and making false promises by which to gain the favor, or power of mortals is a concept that I do believe can make great roleplay, and is something very interesting to consider, however, with nearly any kind of creature in any game, book, or other media, I very much enjoy a break from the stereotypes. (Creatures like Mursaat in GW2, an entire race known to be emotionally complex and bear the same feelings as people- with every single one being unequivocally evil very much bother me.)

 

The concept that these standardly self-serving creatures can have an individual who acts with great compassion to ones commonly viewed as lesser is a fantastic mirror to humanity in my opinion. Though there is an arguement that most human individuals are standardly self-serving, we still get people who can act with great charity, selflessness, and kindness.

 

There is also the arguement to be made that Yeu herself acts with charity and kindness, just cause it makes her feel good, and she has strong morals and convictions about such.

 

 

well sorry you gotta make this god a daemon if you’re really going to try and use this aengul of divinity and “innocence” into beings that are beyond the fathomable scope of reality. You’re trying to force human morality on divine beings and saying that them being self-serving assholes shouldn’t be a common trope, but in this setting its something that makes sense. While this aengudaemon feels quite out of place, I understand the intent behind it but in a world where the gods are actively trying to **** with one another AND the descendants. It’s just a really weird, non-thematic inclusion

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22 minutes ago, ScreamingDingo said:

 

 

well sorry you gotta make this god a daemon if you’re really going to try and use this aengul of divinity and “innocence” into beings that are beyond the fathomable scope of reality. You’re trying to force human morality on divine beings and saying that them being self-serving assholes shouldn’t be a common trope, but in this setting its something that makes sense. While this aengudaemon feels quite out of place, I understand the intent behind it but in a world where the gods are actively trying to **** with one another AND the descendants. It’s just a really weird, non-thematic inclusion

 

This may be based upon an older school of thinking from LT of the past, but in previous explanations, I’ve been told that aenguls and daemons are shockingly human in thinking, and in motivations. And likewise- such is intentionally made to be out of place. The name ‘Yeu Rthulu’ being leagues different from nearly every single aengul name (atleast at the time of the aengul’s original writing) And I do think having a character or creature that breaks the norm is important.

 

I am not claiming that it shouldnt be a common trope, but moreso that there should atleast be an exception to said trope at some point. 

 

Likewise, I was told in the past to make this diety a aengul, given its active interaction with mortals. If this is an official LT request for an edit than I shall do so, however if not I shall keep it as past told to.

 

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I would definitely not say all gods on LOTC are self consumed, maybe most Aengudaemon, but for example dwarven gods and druidic aspects are not..

 

I am a fan of the idea though, if aengudaemon have human-like tendencies and behavior it wouldn’t be so weird for a single one to show compassion and love to those believed minor.

 

+1

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Am i the only one who’s gunna bring up the formatting

 

 

 

please fix the formatting

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4 minutes ago, TheAlphaMoist said:

Am i the only one who’s gunna bring up the formatting

 

 

 

please fix the formatting

 

Agreed.... The formatting is a bit.... Questionable. The lore itself is fine in my eyes, but it's really hard to read this with the used formatting, both on desktop and  on the phone.

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7 hours ago, TheAlphaMoist said:

Am i the only one who’s gunna bring up the formatting

 

 

 

please fix the formatting

the formatting has been destroying itself every few hours.  I have no idea whats causing it.

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On 9/8/2019 at 10:31 PM, ScreamingDingo said:

Hello @Quavinir_Twiceborn

Post is here to confirm that you have gathered all the feedback necessary for your lore and wish to proceed with the reviewing process.

 

Yup! All good! @ScreamingDingo

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Thank you for submitting your piece! It is now under review, a verdict will be given within a few weeks.

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This lore is pending, you will be contacted regarding the issues raised by Story members so you may fix it and given a timeframe for how long you have to do it.

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This Lore has been accepted. Moved to Implemented Lore, it will be sorted to it's appropriate category soon. Please note that if this is playable lore, such as a magic or CA, you will need to write a guide for this piece. You will be contacted regarding the guide (or implementation if it isn’t needed) shortly.

This should have been accepted months ago.

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